Neurology Expert Forum
Left side Facial spasms and now left side body heat?
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Left side Facial spasms and now left side body heat?

In Fall of 2008, I developed an aggressive eye twitch in my left eye that lasted until  May 2009. It was gone for a few months and came back. As it came back, it slowly started to run down the left side of my face. Currently, the spasmas are very aggressive and there aren't 5 seconds that go by that the left side of my face isn't spamming or pulling strongly. It is affecting my vision, my speech, eating and drinking. I have seen a neurologist and was diagnosed with hemi-facial spasms, also being told I was very young for them as I am now 40. I had a full brain MRI a year ago, and my brain is perfect. He recommended Botox, which did nothing but give me a droopy left side that had spasms. These spasms make it so I can't sleep because I can feel them . They don't hurt, but it is very bothersome and embarrassing. And now, yesterday, the left side of my body feels much warmer than my right. As if I wrapped laundry that just came out of the dryer around it. Mainly from my waist down. What is going on with me and what can I do? I feel like I havent had luck with doctors lately.
Avatar_dr_m_tn
Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with your doctor.

Without the ability to obtain a history from you and examine you, I can not comment on a formal diagnosis or treatment plan for your symptoms. However, I will try to provide you with some information regarding this matter.

It must be emphasized that in the MAJORITY of cases muscle twitches are benign meaning that they are of no consequence and are not resulting from a serious cause. In such cases, the twitches may be related to anxiety/stress, caffeine, and often occur after recent strenuous activity or muscle over-use. It is important in such cases to reduce stress/anxiety levels and to reduce caffeine intake. Tremors of the hands can be physiological that is exacerbated by stress/anxiety and caffeine.

Benign fasciculation syndrome, which I will abbreviate as BFS, is a condition in which there are involuntary twitches of various muscle groups, most commonly the legs but also the face, arms, eyes, and tongue. If the diagnosis is confirmed and other causes are excluded, it can be safely said that the likelihood of progression or occurrence of a serious neurologic condition is low.

When BFS is present but not particularly bothersome or disabling, treatment is not necessary. If severe and it requires treatment, there are a few medication options though this condition is not very common, and the research that has been done on its treatment is limited. Minimizing caffeine and stress, and treating anxiety if it is present, will improve your symptoms.

There is a neurological condition called hemifacial spasm, which you mentioned. This is a spasm of the muscles around the eye which may gradually spread to other muscles on the face or neck. It may be aggravated or induced by action or reflexive facial movements. It is not known what exactly causes this condition but it is believed that is due to demyelination of the seventh cranial nerve likely from nerve root compression. The treatment for this condition involves medical therapy with carbamazepine. If this medication fails, baclofen or gabapentin can sometimes be useful. If intolerant to these medications or failure to these medications, botulinum toxin has been used. Failing these conservative measures, surgery may be appropriate.

I suggest follow up with your neurologist. It is important that you discuss your concerns with him/her, including other treatment options.

Thank you for using the forum, I hope you find this information useful, good luck.

2 Comments
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Sorry, my finger hit no, and I meant for it to hit yes for helpful. I looked up BFS and it states that the spasms relax when I would use the muscles. However, that's not the case. I cannot smile, whistle, eat normally. My own control is rare. Anything else in your thoughts?
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank