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Meningioma
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Meningioma

My mother is 59 yrs. old and has been in relatively good health throughout her entire life. She has just been diagnosed with a meningioma in the front left side of her brain. The size has been determined to be 3 cm. by 2 cm.. The neurosurgeon has told us that this is a very small meningioma and not to worry and no surgery is required a the moment. They will monitor her meningioma every 3 months to make sure that it doesn't increase in size. On the other hand, her neurologist has told us that this meningioma is quite large, (he used the word golf ball sized), and needs to be removed immediately. He recommends a visit to Cleveland Clinic to let them decide. My question is is this considered a small meningioma, should it be removed immediately, and who is right in their diagnosis. Also, should we seek out another opinion.
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1.When we evaluate patients with meningiomas, size is not the biggest issue. Rather, it's location of the tumor, the clinical exam (whether it's causing neurological problems like weakness, speech changes, etc...), and whether or not it's actually invading the brain. As I have not personally seen your mother's imaging studies, it's difficult to give an accurate opinion as to whether or not this is considered "quite large," but I would say that it is a significant size. Again, it's all relative. If this were in the brainstem, it would be considered huge by all means.
2.Unless your mother has neurological deficits such as right sided weakness and speech changes (which could accompany a left frontal tumor depending on where it is)or has signs/symptoms of increased cranial pressure, there is no emergent need for surgery.
3.Can't say who's right/wrong. But as you're getting conflicting information, I would recommend a second opinion. Drs. Gene Barnett and Michael Vogelbaum are excellent neurosurgeons here at the clinic who specialize in brain tumor surgery.
Good luck.
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