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My 11 year old nephew had a seizure out of the blue
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My 11 year old nephew had a seizure out of the blue

Yesterday my nephew woke up in the morning and then had a major seizure in his bed and was found by his brother who called 911.  He has never had a seizure before and his CT and blood work came out normal.  They did find however a MAJOR sinus infection and that his adenoids (adenoids) were extremely large.  He has told the Dr. that he is scared to fall asleep at night because sometimes he feels like he can't breath.  One more note is that he got hit in the head with a baseball 2 months ago and went the ER and they did at CT and said that there was no damage or trauma.  Now it just seems weird that he has this seizure.  The CT scan done after the seizure showed nothing again however.  We are all worried that he is going to have epilepsy.  Could this seizure just be cause by the sinus infection and adenoid problem or is it most likely going to be something that he is going to have to be scared of reoccuring for the rest of his life?  He is scheduled for an EEG today.
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Infections and fevers can make an individual more likely to have a seizure. Your nephew has only had one seizure and therefore would not be called epilepsy. Typically a person is diagnosed with epilepsy after having more then one seizure. The EEG that he is having today will help in predicitng his possibility of having future seizures. He will also most likely need an MRI to ensure that there are no structural abnormalities in his brain. A CT scan rules out the big things, but an MRI takes a more eloquent picture of the brain. If the EEG and MRI are normal that is encouraging, but does not mean he will not have another seizure. If they are abnormal it becomes more likely, but not absolute, that he will have more seizures.

If he does have abnormalities have him see an epilepsy doctor. There are a multitude of good drugs on the market which can be used.
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Avatar_n_tn
My brother was an active epileptic till around the age of 9. This was many years ago as he is now 43.  Many children get what is known as febrile seizures which are caused by high temperatures. You also mentioned he had a sinus infection and his adnoids were enlarged. That could be the source of the seizure.  If the adenoids (adenoids) are large enough they could be hampering the area of the brain.  Also, if all tests come out clear I would recommend seeing an Ears, Nose and Throat doctor as they can do wonders today.  Also, be supportive of your nephew and mention to other family members not to show their anxiety or fear as one thing a child can do is pick that up and his/her imagination can run with it thinking that they are going to die.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thanks for both replies.  We just found out today that his EEG came back with abnormal findings.  They are scheduling an MRI at this time. How come the CT came back normal and all the other blood work, then the EEG would come back abnormal?  The Dr. has pretty much scared the family to death.  He basically told them that this isn't good that the EEG came back abnormal and that he could have a mass or something major wrong with him.  What are the causes of an EEG coming back abnormal?  Could it be epilepsy which can be treated with meds or something very wrong the could result in death like cancerous brain tumor or something to that regard?  I am just hoping to find out some news that may lessen their fears until the MRI results are back.

Thanks for anyones input.
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Avatar_n_tn
The EEG shows the electrical activity in the brain, so it's very possible to have normal bloodwork and a CT scan, but an abnormal EEG.  An abnormal EEG just means that they saw abnormal electrical activity.  So, depending on how the EEG is interpreted, depends on whether they say your nephew has a tendency toward seizures.  A follow-up MRI is in order to rule out other causes.  It's interesting to note that many epileptics have normal EEGs.  So, it's not always the definitive test used to determine if one has epilepsy.  The doctor has to factor in clinical signs witnessed by others as well as the results of any tests he may have ordered before making a determination if one has epilepsy or not.  

Oftentimes, there is no known "cause" for epilepsy, so treating with medication to prevent future seizures is standard.  Some people do take a wait-and-see approach before opting for medication, especially if the EEG is clear, but if there are indicators that a person does have a tendency toward seizures by virture of an abnormal EEG, and have had a known seizure, then seizure medication is suggested.
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Avatar_n_tn
My husband is recovering from brain surgery after having a seizure in conjunction with a sinus infection.  The infection was so severe that it "leeched" from the sinuses onto the outer covering of his brain, thus causing the seizure. If your nephew has had an MRI and he does have an infection, it will show up there. I'm not telling you this to scare you - my husband is doing fine - but most people don't realize how serious a sinus infection can be if the antibiotics don't work. My best to you and your nephew.
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