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Need Help understanding my MRI
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Need Help understanding my MRI

I had an MRI done. Experiencing Numbness in feet, and left ear ringing.

Here is some info from the MRI

TECHNIQUE: Routine brain, without and with IV gadolinium. Routine MRA of the circle of Willis. CONTRAST: 10 ml Magnevist. FINDINGS: There is a 1.5 cm zone of increased T2 signal intensity adjacent to the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. There are a few additional small foci of increased T2 signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, some of which have a periventricular location. There is a small focus adjacent to the frontal horn of the right lateral ventricle demonstrating mild contrast enhancement. The findings are most consistent with a demyelinating process, with an active focus of demyelination adjacent to the right frontal horn. There is no evidence for acute ischemia or intracranial hemorrhage. No mass lesions are identified. Thin section images through the internal auditory canals were not obtained. If desired, the patient could be brought back for further imaging at no additional cost. The paranasal sinuses are unremarkable. MRA OF THE CIRCLE OF WILLIS: There is no evidence for major vessel occlusion. There is no evidence for an aneurysm or vascular malformation. The circle of Willis is anomalous, with an absent right posterior communicating artery. IMPRESSION: 1. Multiple foci of increased T2 signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, with a large focus adjacent to the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Small enhancing focus just superior to the frontal horn of the right lateral ventricle. The findings are most consistent with a demyelinating process such as multiple sclerosis, with a small active focus of demyelination in the right frontal lobe. Clinical and laboratory correlation is suggested. Other possibilities would include vasculitis. A less likely consideration is Lyme disease. 2. No evidence for acute ischemia or intracranial hemorrhage. No pathologic gadolinium enhancement identified. 3. Thin section images through the internal auditory canals were not obtained. If desired, the patient could be brought back for further imaging at no additional charge. 4. Absent right posterior communicating artery. Otherwise unremarkable MRA of the circle of Willis.


Could this be due to a pinched nerve.
I also have a history of depression, although it was a circumstance, and I have managed with excercised.
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No, this is not from a pinched nerve. It appears to be from a disease called multiple sclerosis. Please go to the patient to patient forum, and as Quix for help in interpeting these findings. She is a retired pediatritian who has MS and is very very knowledgable about this disease. Sorry for your seeming diagnosis. MS can also cause depression by physically injuring the nerves. Good luck and God Bless
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