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Nerve damage after bad fall?
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Nerve damage after bad fall?

I posted here before asking about several issues.  Now I have developed some new symptoms and would like to try and get some answers.  I have been diagnosed with Gastroparesis recently.  Lately, I am feeling more of a paralized feeling in my lower back and legs when lying on my back and putting pressure on my lowere spine. I have practically no feeling when I have to have a B.M. anymore.  I use laxatives and suppositories to help me go to the bathroom but I generally have no sensation that I have to go.  My doctor wants me on Reglan, but I have put off using it because I feel that I already have enough problems right now.  My question is this:  I took a very bad fall off the back of a chair about 6 months ago and landed on my back, was taken by ambulance to E.R. as I couldn't move because of severe pain.  They took exray, said nothing was broken and sent me home. I couldn't even move without percocette pain killers.  I also have osteoporosis and Graves Disease. Could this fall have done some nerve damage that is causing these problems? What type of test would confirm this?  Thank you
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Trauma to the back can cause in injury to the spinal cord, which can usually be identified by an MRI scan.

Problems with urination and bowel movement can come with a spinal problem, usually always with some degree of spasticity in the legs (stiff legs with hyperactive reflexes). THese functions occur with disorders of the autonomic nervous system. Gastroparesis can occur from disease or nerves that do not travel in teh spinal cord, so its possible that there is a more widespread problem with the autonomic system.

There are a variety of tests that may objectively demonstrate an abnormality adn where it is. Somatosensory evoked potentials are sensitive to detect abnormalites in the spinal cord nerve tracts. Pudendal or anal sphincter studies can be done with an EMG needle test. A gastric emptying study can investigate gastric emptying if not done already. Other autonomic system tests include cardiovascular tests, and sweating tests

Good luck
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Than you for the reply to my question.  I have an appointment with a neurologist in 2 weeks.  I have had so many different issues over the past year.  Tacchycardia, temperature rising for no apparent reason, eye inflammation (always left eye only-steroids help), various pain in different parts of body that sometimes feel like electrical shock, photophobic, vertigo and many more.
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