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New seizures
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New seizures

My dad had a seizure at church last night where he made a strange sound then curled up his hands, turned gray and stopped breathing for a brief time. He has no recollection of the event, but he does remember getting a strange feeling right before it happened.  Last year, almost to the day, he did the same thing only his entire body became completely rigid and he fell flat on the kitchen floor earning himself a concussion as well. I guess my family and I were in denial that this was in fact a seizure last year and my dad decided not to start on anti seizure medication.  I guess I am trying to figure out why he went so long without this occurring again, and what could have triggered it off. His EEG and MRI were both negative.   He was electrocuted at work 30 years ago to the point where he should not be here today. Could this have caused these seizures? I am so afraid that he will have one while driving.
The neurologist that he has seen is very closed minded, so I wanted to see if you had any suggestions or opinions on the matter.  Thanks so much.
Tags: seizures
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with your doctor.

Without the ability to examine your dad and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of his seizures symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

Certain factors are known to trigger seizures in adults. These include head trauma (though not electrocution to my knowledge), a history of brain surgery, a history of brain infection, a systemic infection (such as a urinary tract infection or a pneumonia), a history of childhood seizures, a family history of seizures, a brain tumor or other brain lesion, sleep deprivation, and alcohol intoxication or withdrawal. Something as sleep deprivation can bring on seizures if it is severe enough. Sometimes, the exact precipiating cause is not found. If an EEG has not shown abnormalities, this does not necessarily imply that the person does not have epilepsy (abnormal EEGs are helpful, but normal ones do not exclude epilepsy). Sometimes, it takes up to 4 EEGs to find an abnormality. In some cases, prolonged EEG monitoring (admission to an epilepsy unit for EEG over days) is needed to understand the seizures better.

After a first seizure, anti-seizure medications are not always started. If the EEG and MRI are normal, some people choose, along with guidance from their doctor, not to start seizure medications. After the second seizure, the risk of a third seizure is much  higher, and anti-epileptics are strongly recommended, particularly when a reversible cause for the seizures is not found.

Continued follow-up with the neurologist is recommended.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.
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