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Pressure on back of head, neck, and back.
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Pressure on back of head, neck, and back.

For three weeks now I have been having a strange pushing sensation on the back of my head, neck, and back.  At first I thought it was a very unique migraine and on the 7th day I went to the Emergency room - they gave me 5mg diazempan and 30mg toradal via I.V.  I passed out.  When I left there the drugs were still working but it still felt like I had a migraine so I used Migranal when I got home.  No luck.  I went to my neurologist the next day and he gave me a prescription for 5mg of diazepam twice a day and said to use the skelaxin I all ready had as a muscle relaxant.  This did not give me much relief so I called into the doctor's office again and he gave me 10mg diazepam twice a day and I have been using Naproxen Sodium with it for a muscle relaxant.  Skelaxin and Diazepam produce a very uncomfortable sensation in me.  I'm getting some relief from the 10mg diazepam.  The next thing my doctor is going to do is to give me botox to try and get rid of my migraines and other headaches.  What is going on with my head, neck, and back????????
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with a doctor.

Without the ability to examine and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of the symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

Two causes of neck pain associated with headache are cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia.

Cervicogenic headache is a headache that is "referred" to the head from bony structures, muscles, and other soft tissue in the neck and shoulders. Symptoms are usually one-sided and include: precipitation of head pain by neck movement or awkward neck positions, head pain when external pressure is applied to the neck or occipital region, restricted range of motion of the neck, and neck, shoulder and arm pain. Treatment for cervicogenic headache includes physical therapy, medications, behavioral therapy, and other modalities.

Occipital neuralgia is caused by irritation or injury to two nerves that run from the upper neck to the back of the head. The irritation could be due to neck trauma, pinching of the nerves (by muscles or arthritis), and other causes. Symptoms include a piercing sharp pain that travels from the upper neck to the back of the head and behind the ears. It is usually a one sided pain but can be on both sides of the head. Treatment includes physical therapy, medications, and in some cases injections, "nerve blocks", during which a physician injects the irritated nerves with an anesthetic.

A concerning cause of neck pain associated with headache is a dissection: a small tear in the blood vessels that travel up the neck to the brain. This can occur spontaneously in people with certain conditions that affect the blood vessels, after neck trauma, or after chiropractic manipulation of the neck. The pain is often but not always associated with some sort of neurologic deficit as a dissection can often lead to a stroke. A dissection is diagnosed with a specific type of MRI test (MRA with fat saturation) or an CT angiogram.

I suggest that if your neck pain/ headache persists and/or becomes more severe, and/or if you develop neurologic signs like weakness on one side of the body, slurring of speech, double vision, difficulty speaking, and so on that you be seen immediately by a doctor. Otherwise, you should continue following up with your neurologist.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.

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