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Re: stroke
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This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

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Re: stroke

Posted By CCF Neurology MD - AY on December 28, 1998 at 17:44:47:

In Reply to: stroke posted by Lizabeth on December 28, 1998 at 12:05:08:






First I would like to thank you for your reply to my message of 12/21/98.  You said that there were some gaps in my message, I will try to fill those in.  My mom did have a hemorrhagic stroke on the same side as her surgery.  My mom was not prone to headaches,  her headache was a frontal headache so intense that she stayed in bed after she came home from the hospital.  My dad took her back to the hospital because her headache wouldn't stop and the next morning she had a stroke.  She had to have brain surgery to remove the blood and she almost died.  I am not sure what an infarct is,  and what is a hemorrhagic transformation could you explain it to me?  Her head hurt for the whole time after her surgery and it just seems to me the doctors should have found out why her head was hurting.  Is there anything that can  be done to make her better? Thank you. Lizabeth Campbell




Thanks for your question.  The occurrence of severe headache on the same side
of her neck surgery is more suggestive of a primary hemorrhagic event, since
infarcts are usually not associated with pain.  An infarct is an area of
a tissue that dies due to the lack of blood supply - e.g. myocardial infarcts
that results from the blockage of coronary arteries in the heart.  Sometimes
brain infarct (especially if the volume of the infarct is large) can be followed
by bleeding into the infarct/dead area, due to the damage/necrosis of the
blood vessels inside the infarct.  It is unusual for such neck surgeries
to be complicated by hemorrhagic infarcts, and without access to her actual
medical records, it is my impression that her physicians took all the
appropriate and necessary steps in her clinical management.
I hope this information is helpful.  Best of luck.
This information is provided for general medical education purposes only.
Please consult your doctor regarding diagnostic and treatment options.

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