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Shooting pain in the left leg
I have been a patient of Ankylosing Spondylosis for the past 20 years. My HLA B27 Antigen is positive. For the past 2½ years I have been having a tremendous burning sensation in my leg as well as a shooting pain in the left leg, shooting down from my buttock to foot from time to time. The burning sensation started first at my left big toe.

The MRI was done and the impression of L.S. Spine revealed:-

1. Partial fusion with calcification of L4-L5, L5-S1 discs along with calcification of long ligament and obliteration (Sclerosis) of SI joints suggest Ankylosing Spondylosis.
2. Compression of bilateral foraminal nerve roots at L4-L5 level.

Report of LUMBO SACRAL SPINE AP/LAT VIEW:
“BAMBOO SPINE” appearances of lumber spine with obliterated S.I. joints are suggestive of advanced ankylosing spondylosis. Lumber lordosis is lost.

On the basis of MRI report, a neuro-surgeon, performed a surgery on  October, 2007. (L4-L5 Laminectomy and L4-L5 Faraminotomy). Despite the surgery I am still having the same burning sensation and shooting pain. Most irritating is the shooting pain. The pain is sudden and intolerable. The pain aggravates while sitting, somewhat relieved by walking and lying down. No pain in the spine. Please help me.
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   Hi I also have Ankylosing Spondylosis I was haveing the same pains for about a year and a half, Rheumatologist sent me to surgeron also. He did not do surgery sent me to neurologist he did EMG study and found polyneuropathy by that time I had lost control of most of right leg. Also I take Humira injections that slowed the A.S. alot

                                                                     Hope it helps, good luck              
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368886 tn?1466238884
Hello.

The surgery that was done on your spine was basically aimed at preventing further physical damage to the nerve roots. It may not necessarily reduce the pain. About one third of the people with such surgeries continue to have some pain after the surgery. You will have to fall back on physical therapy and medication for ankylosing spondylitis.

And EMG and nerve conduction study would help figure out if there is persistent nerve damage. A repeat follow up MRI will he important.

Regards
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