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Stroke Victims and Flying in aircraft
I had two strokes four weeks ago while in the hospital for head aches. I spent 5 days in the intensive care unit and another five in a rehabilitation center. We expect very minimal residual effects, but I still walk with difficulty. Months ago I planned a trip to California with my husband. We will need to leave in ten days, but I don't want to put myself in danger. On the Internet, I can't find any information which says that flying commercial aircraft is safe or otherwise for recent stroke victims. I asked my neurologist and he said, "I can't say yes and I can't say no." What kind of answer is that?
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I think what he means is that with strokes you never know. I don't think that flying in an airplane will put you at any greater risk than if you were at home. The only difference would be that at home you would be able to go directly to the ER but in a plan you have to wait to land. I don't mean to scare you, but that's about the only difference. Perhaps a better question to ask is what the possibilities for re-occurance are and then weigh that against flying to Cali with your husband.
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I think it depends on what caused your strokes.  If you have some kind of clotting problem that causes you to form clots (and contributed to your strokes) then possibly it wouldn't be a good idea--but your doctor knows best.  Regardless, if you are sitting for any period of time, whether on a plane or during a long car trip, try to move your legs/flex your feet, get up and walk around in order to keep the blood flowing so it doesn't have a chance to pool and form clots.  That's a good idea for anyone to do.  
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I also am asking myself the same questions about flying. I have been having hemorrhagic strokes and am due to fly to mayo clinic mid aug. I am wondering if the increased pressure of flying will cause increased cranial pressure which in turn could cause a stroke.
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Hi,

If it is possible to postpone the trip by a few weeks it would be great. A journey would mean stress and since you are still recovering from an illness it is better to avoid any kind of stress if possible.

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I just read on the University of Wisconsin health website that after any kind of intracranial bleed, the patient should wait 6 weeks before flying on an airplane. www.uwhealth.org
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Hi , my son of 9 months had a brain stroke imidiatly after birth ( middle cerebral infarct) of the right side.He is doing fine,only problem he has now is that he can not use his left fingers 100 percent,.In june of 2010 we  must fly for 5 hours, would that be a risk for my son ? , The blood tests showed that he does not have a blood clotting problem. PLease help ?
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