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cistern maga and arachnoid cyst
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cistern maga and arachnoid cyst

what are they and what is the treatment for this


This discussion is related to enlarged cisterna magna / prominent posterior fossa cisterns.
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Hi, “The cisterna magna (or cerebellomedullary cistern) is one of three principal openings in the subarachnoid space between the arachnoid and pia mater layers of the meninges surrounding the brain. The openings are collectively referred to as cisterns. Cerebrospinal fluid produced in the fourth ventricle drains into the cisterna magna via the lateral apertures and median aperture”.

Taken from website http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisterna_magna

“Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid-filled sacs that are located between the brain or spinal cord and the arachnoid membrane, one of the three membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord.   Primary arachnoid cysts are present at birth and are the result of developmental abnormalities in the brain and spinal cord that arise during the early weeks of gestation.  Secondary arachnoid cysts are not as common as primary cysts and develop as a result of head injury, meningitis, or tumors, or as a complication of brain surgery.  The majority of arachnoid cysts form outside the temporal lobe of the brain in an area of the skull known as the middle crania fossa.  Arachnoid cysts involving the spinal cord are rarer.  The location and size of the cyst determine the symptoms and when those symptoms begin.  Most individuals with arachnoid cysts develop symptoms before the age of 20, and especially during the first year of life, but some people with arachnoid cysts never have symptoms.  Males are four times more likely to have arachnoid cysts than females.  

Typical symptoms of an arachnoid cyst around the brain include headache, nausea and vomiting, seizures, hearing and visual disturbances, vertigo, and difficulties with balance and walking.  Arachnoid cysts around the spinal cord compress the spinal cord or nerve roots and cause symptoms such as progressive back and leg pain and tingling or numbness in the legs or arms.  Diagnosis usually involves a brain scan using diffusion-weighted MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) which helps distinguish fluid-filled arachnoid cysts from other types of cysts”.  

Taken from website http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/arachnoid_cysts/arachnoid_cysts.htm

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