Neurology Community
coccyx removal
About This Community:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

coccyx removal

I have had back/ankle trouble for 20 yrs. I have just had a sub talar fusion on one ankle which is healing nicely and other one done later. My coccyx has always been quite painful and dislodged several times, however, since last year my oesteopath has put it back for me twice internally, and it hasnt even lasted a day. He says i need to have it removed. I have done all the pain killers and injections, they have not worked. I am perfectly fine walking and standing, the pain is only there when sitting and lying down. Could you please tell me if you think this is the right thing to do? And what department do i go to, Neurology (which a nurse has told me) or Orthapedics? Also how long after the operation does the pain go and you can sit comfortably? Thankyou for your time.
Related Discussions
4 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
147426_tn?1317269232
It sounds like you've been through the ringer and tried the proper conservative maneuvers.  It's not my field of expertise, but I do not believe the coccyx is a vital bone for good living.  I know some coccygeal injuries require eventual removal.  I don't know anything about the surgery or recovery time.  I suspect (but do not promise) the relief would be almost immediate.  Whe you are in pain from the coccyx, every motion of your lower body from sitting to walking to pooping makes it hurt.

The coccyx is a part of the spain, but does not carry any large nerves through it.

As for surgery, I would seek and opion from a lower back specialist, orthopedist.  Then make your decision.

Good luck with your decision.  Quix
Blank
147426_tn?1317269232
HarleyDude makes a good point, but overstates the danger of fecal incontinence.  Because an important nerve bundle (which innervates the rectal muscle) danger of damaging it by an unskilled surgeon.  However, in studies looking at complications, it is not a common one.  By far the most common complication is infection and that risk is fairly high - about 50%, though some were minor infections.  

All the studies emphasize that all conservative measures should be tried first.  The surgery is most successful when there has been truama to the coccyx and when there is instability (as opposed to pain from something like arthritis).  In cases where the patients were carefully chosen and the surgeon had experience in performing the surgery, the success in relieving pain was as high as 90%.

It appears to me that no one should consider the surgery lightly, but that the risks should be weighed against the quality of life when the patient has unrelenting pain limiting activities.

Here is a fairly long article on the subject.  I offer it because of the extensive list of more conservative things to try before resorting to surgery.  

http://www.emedicine.com/pmr/topic242.htm

Good luck, again, Quix
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I have the same issue; I have been in active treatment for seven years for chronic coccydynia, sciatica and damage to ganglion impar nerve. The coccyx is the anchor point of your spine and is very important. Check out this link although it is for roids it gives detailed drawings and explanations. http://www.hemorrhoid.net/anatomy.php

I was told by many Docs not to remove the coccyx it could cause bowl incontinence at the very minimum. I know you stated you tried injections have you tried injections to ganglion impar this has helped a lot of people and has a high success rate. http://www.coccyx.org/treatmen/foye.htm

I was told to make sure 30 gr of fiber a day and to drink at least 8 glasses of water per day as bowel movements can irratate an injured coccyx.

If you are having constipation on a regular basis watch out for diverticulitis.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I read your comments with great interest having lived with pain for more than 20 years.  Original problem linked to fall in teens.  Cortisone etc injections and physio in early 20s then it settled down and I endured for next 15 years.  Birth of second daugther 5 years ago has excacerbated and I am now recieving treatment through pain management centre (cortisone and nerve blocks -pulsed radiotherapy).  Relief lasts approx one month and I am considering surgery.  Consultant not keen and has stressed risks to pelvic floor etc.  I know I need someone experienced but don't really know where to turn.
Advice greatfully recieved
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Neurology Answerers
620923_tn?1405964489
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
144586_tn?1284669764
Blank
caregiver222
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
Ball123
1689801_tn?1333986916
Blank
Dagun
Iceland
352007_tn?1372861481
Blank
LisaJF
1780921_tn?1384615710
Blank
flipper336
Chandler, AZ