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ct scan mircoangiopatic changes
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ct scan mircoangiopatic changes

My father got a CT scan and the results came back as microangiopathic changes but no strokes or tumors.  Please explain.  First off he cant have a MRI because he has a magnetic chip in his eye due to an accident in the Koren war.  He has been to the VA and they state his only eye he has is working fine however, he is seeing things and having problems with judging what is in front of him and whats not there. He asked my mom last week who the little girl was in the kitchen and there was no one at there house.  I fear that its Alzheimers and not sure what else I should be doing or the nexdt thing that should be done.  He turned 80 in Feb and my mom is 88.  Worried...
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with a doctor.

Without the ability to examine and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of the symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

Microangiopathic changes (aka small vessel disease), when present, on CT are areas that appear darker than the other areas. These areas are where very small vessels have changes that show long-term damage. The damage can be from high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and high cholesterol. If these factors are well controlled, the damage to the brain can be stabilized and further damage prevented. While the presence of small vessel disease does not predict dementia, it may increase risk of a type of dementia called vascular dementia, and likely increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease though research regarding the latter is ongoing.

It is difficult to diagnose dementia based on imaging alone. There are criteria that are used to diagnose the various dementias and the dementia severity. The most significant finding on imaging for future risk of dementia is cerebral atrophy. Other risk factors include age, family history, alcohol abuse, head trauma, etc. I would suggest that your father follow up with a geriatrician.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.

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