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5531927 tn?1445278519
ct scan normal but I still have symptoms
My question is to anyone who has high frequency hearing loss in one hear.
My ct scan was normal but I still have hearing loss and fullness in left ear. I also get headaches, have some dizziness (but mild) and very mild tinnitus.
My specialist and my family Dr both suspect a small acoustic neurons but my MRI is still 6 months away. The question is, how big does a neurons have to be before a ct will show it and also do you think my Dr. Would be fairly convinced that's what it is before he mentions the possibility of a neuroma?  We've pretty much ruled out anything else.  Thanks!
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Avatar universal
Hi,
How are you? An acoustic neuroma, a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain, usually grows slowly. As it grows, it presses against the hearing and balance nerves. The exact size varies depending on individual's anatomy and medical history. It can indeed be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are similar to those of middle ear problems. Ear exams, hearing tests, and scans may help. If the symptoms persist, it is best that you discuss this with your doctor. You may  also benefit from referral to specialists. Take care and do keep us posted.
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152264 tn?1280358257
Hi Diana--I don't know how big an acoustic neuroma would have to be before being visible on CT. You really just need the MRI to find out if you have one. Make sure the MRI is done WITH CONTRAST--this is very important to find the smallest acoustic neuroma.

If you have migraines, it's VERY possible that migraine is the cause of your symptoms. Many doctors don't know this, but migraine can cause hearing loss, dizziness, and a bunch of other strange symptoms. The symptom complex often overlaps with the symptoms of Meniere's disease, and it's now thought that Meniere's and vestibular migraine might be pretty much the same thing. Please look up "vestibular migraine" or "migraine-associated dizziness" or "migraine-associated vertigo" and especially see the excellent information at:

http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/central/migraine/mav.html

Dr. Tim Hain's site. Vestibular migraine is becoming more and more known about and accepted.

Gosh, I don't envy you waiting 6 months for an MRI with the uncertainty of not knowing if you have an AN. More likely you don't have one, but still, you have to worry about it for way too long a time!

Your one-sided hearing loss is certainly suspicious for AN, which is why the doctor mentioned it, but most hearing loss is NOT due to AN. They are only keen to rule it out because it is potentially serious. (Usually not an emergency, though.)

(I had a sudden and permanent one-sided hearing loss when I sneezed hard, plus longtime low-level dizziness probably similar to what you describe, both ongoing symptoms, and I finally concluded--on my own, since doctors couldn't give me a diagnosis--that the dizziness, at least, is due to painless migraines. I was fortunate to have AN ruled out within a few weeks with an MRI.)

Good luck!
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