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fainting, dizziness, vision problems
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fainting, dizziness, vision problems

Hi, I am 19 year old female. I have been experiencing problems for the last 8 months. It all started one evening after I was out in
hail storm, I went inside and was freezing cold and really dizzy and passed out. I have passed out 3 times in the last several months. I am dizzy constantly but have these "episodes" probably twice a week, where I am severly dizzy(to the point of falling/not being able to walk)headache, most recently Neck pain, tingling/shooting pain in my hands, feet and back. As well as numbess, I get extremley cold and start to lose feeling in my hands and feet. I also have really bad shaking in my right arm (tremor) and I get really confused. I also get blurry vision and my eyes twitch. I have been seeing a neurologist, I had a brain mri as well as an eeg that DR. said were normal (except for a small cyst somewhere that I was told was unrelated). MY doctor said I had an inner ear problem for the last 6 months, now he said he does not know what the problem is. So I'm thinking maybe get a second opinion, this doctor seems a little unorganized as well, he didn't even have the full mri report when I had went in a month after to see him. I am currently on medication, I have been on lyrica for about 3 months, 75 mg 3 times a day. And now I am on metanx, doctor said from bloodwork that my b12 level was a low normal, at 286. My doctor said that could cause some dizziness and numbness but he does not act like that is the main problem. I was just wondering if any of you have any advice as far as a possible problem, if I should get a second opinion, is there a way you can go about finding a good doctor? My insurance is not too good, so I already owe thousands of dollars so I would rather not have to go through the same thing again and have no answers still. I just want to feel better.
Also when this problem happens I get extremley tired/fatigued.
Also wanted to add that last thursday night I lost complete feeling in half of my right hand as well as some numbness and tingling in my feet (lasted for about 2 hours) then I fell when I tried to get up and walk. Then friday night I passed out. I've also noticed lately at times my vision in my left eye goes gray, but it only lasts for a few mins. I went to the doc last tuesday, he said he was not concerned about the numbness, tingling (electric shocks feeling) because it's not constant, it comes and goes. Which is fine I was just hoping there was something I can do about it because it's kinda "inconvient" when your trying to walk and your legs go numb. My next appointment with my doc is in 2 months, hopefully things will get better. Any advice appreciated
Thanks
alot!
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3 Comments Post a Comment
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147426_tn?1317269232
Wow, these sound like miserable episodes!  What you describe sounds like a variant of migraine; either hemiplegic migraine or basilar migraine.  Either of these would account for most of the symptoms you describe except for the constant dizziness.  I wonder if it is the dizziness that sets off the headaches.

Here are description of the headaches:

Hemiplegic Migraine:

"Hemiplegic migraine is a very rare but well described form of MV (migraine variant). It was initially described in 1910 as a type of migraine consisting of recurrent headaches associated with temporary unilateral hemiparesis or hemiplegia, at times accompanied by ipsilateral numbness or tingling, with or without a speech disturbance. The focal neurologic deficit may precede or accompany the headache, which is usually less dramatic than motor deficit. Other migraine symptoms may variably be present. Patients may also experience disturbance of consciousness, and rarely coma. The neurologic deficit is transient and usually clears in minutes to hours, or resolves with the beginning of the headache phase. "

In translation: This is an unusual variation of migraine headaches with temporary one-sided weakness or paralysis, sometimes with numbness or tingling on that same side.  There may be speech difficulties.  The problems in the limb may come before or during the headache and the headaches are usually  less upsetting or severe than the weakness or other symptoms.  There may be mental confusion, loss of consciousness or even coma.  The problems with weakness or numbness are temporary lasting minutes to hours or stop as the headache begins.  Other symptoms of migraine headaches (like nausea, vomiting sensitivity to light and sound, etc. ) may also occur.


***********************

Basilar Migraine:

"Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness. BM is observed most frequently in adolescent girls and young women.   Differential diagnosis includes various causes of syncopal, inner ear disease, intoxication, and posterior fossa pathologies."

Interpretation:  Basilar migraine consists of headache, usually in the back of the head both sides, with dizziness, loss of balance, difficulty maintaining your posture, ringing (or some sound in your head),  bilateral numbness/tingling and weakness (may not be symmetrical - such as numbness in one place and weakness on the other side), muffled hearing, nausea and vomiting, slurred speech, visual problems, such as double vision, confusion or lethargy, fainting.  Occurs in all ages but is more common in young women.  Other diagnoses to consider include other causes of fainting, inner ear disease, drug use, or brain tumors in the back of the head.

**************************

These are just two ideas.  In addition there is a migraine which causes vertigo (dizziness) but usually in attacks.  These migraines are related to the second one above, the basilar migraines.

Your MRI rules out the tumor part.  Both of these types of headache are very disabling.  Also migraine can be triggered by other severe sensations or stresses.  I wonder if your episodes may be triggered by the dizziness.  I think you match the basilar type the closest.  There are preventative meds.  Lyrica is used this way, but it clearly isn't working.

Is the dizziness made worse by any change in position?  On any of the occasions when you passed out, did you strike your head - say enough for a little soreness or a little goose-egg?

Is there any family history of migraine?

Any worsening around your cycle?

Finally, you may need to see a dizziness expert because you having dizziness even between more severe attacks.  We could talk about this further.  If you wish I could give you some links to descriptions of these types of migraine and recommendations for treatment that you could discuss with your doctor.

Just some ideas, Quix
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147426_tn?1317269232
Wow, these sound like miserable episodes!  What you describe sounds like a variant of migraine; either hemiplegic migraine or basilar migraine.  Either of these would account for most of the symptoms you describe except for the constant dizziness.  I wonder if it is the dizziness that sets off the headaches.

Here are description of the headaches:

Hemiplegic Migraine:

"Hemiplegic migraine is a very rare but well described form of MV (migraine variant). It was initially described in 1910 as a type of migraine consisting of recurrent headaches associated with temporary unilateral hemiparesis or hemiplegia, at times accompanied by ipsilateral numbness or tingling, with or without a speech disturbance. The focal neurologic deficit may precede or accompany the headache, which is usually less dramatic than motor deficit. Other migraine symptoms may variably be present. Patients may also experience disturbance of consciousness, and rarely coma. The neurologic deficit is transient and usually clears in minutes to hours, or resolves with the beginning of the headache phase. "

In translation: This is an unusual variation of migraine headaches with temporary one-sided weakness or paralysis, sometimes with numbness or tingling on that same side.  There may be speech difficulties.  The problems in the limb may come before or during the headache and the headaches are usually  less upsetting or severe than the weakness or other symptoms.  There may be mental confusion, loss of consciousness or even coma.  The problems with weakness or numbness are temporary lasting minutes to hours or stop as the headache begins.  Other symptoms of migraine headaches (like nausea, vomiting sensitivity to light and sound, etc. ) may also occur.


***********************

Basilar Migraine:

"Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness. BM is observed most frequently in adolescent girls and young women.   Differential diagnosis includes various causes of syncopal, inner ear disease, intoxication, and posterior fossa pathologies."

Interpretation:  Basilar migraine consists of headache, usually in the back of the head both sides, with dizziness, loss of balance, difficulty maintaining your posture, ringing (or some sound in your head),  bilateral numbness/tingling and weakness (may not be symmetrical - such as numbness in one place and weakness on the other side), muffled hearing, nausea and vomiting, slurred speech, visual problems, such as double vision, confusion or lethargy, fainting.  Occurs in all ages but is more common in young women.  Other diagnoses to consider include other causes of fainting, inner ear disease, drug use, or brain tumors in the back of the head.

**************************

These are just two ideas.  In addition there is a migraine which causes vertigo (dizziness) but usually in attacks.  These migraines are related to the second one above, the basilar migraines.

Your MRI rules out the tumor part.  Both of these types of headache are very disabling.  Also migraine can be triggered by other severe sensations or stresses.  I wonder if your episodes may be triggered by the dizziness.  I think you match the basilar type the closest.  There are preventative meds.  Lyrica is used this way, but it clearly isn't working.

Is the dizziness made worse by any change in position?  On any of the occasions when you passed out, did you strike your head - say enough for a little soreness or a little goose-egg?

Is there any family history of migraine?

Any worsening around your cycle?

Finally, you may need to see a dizziness expert because you having dizziness even between more severe attacks.  We could talk about this further.  If you wish I could give you some links to descriptions of these types of migraine and recommendations for treatment that you could discuss with your doctor.

Just some ideas, Quix
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Avatar_n_tn
First off thank you very much for taking the time to respond!  I appreciate your comments!  I will definitely look into the migraines.  Sometimes when an "episode" happens i get a headache afterwards, usually it is not severe and sometimes i don't get a headache.  Last time i passed out i had really bad neck pain.  I don't believe i've ever hit my head after passing out, i didn't notice any bumps or anything.  The severe dizziness is the worst part of all of it, the dizziness was actually a little better a couple of weeks ago then i caught some kind of virus and the dizziness has not gone away since then.  The dizziness seems to be a little worse when i go from sitting to standing. It's definitely a pain, cause i tend to fall alot between dizziness and numbness. No family history of migraines that i'm aware of.  Oh and it does seem to get worse around my cycle.  I told my doc that he said yeah hormones changing.  It seems like the lyrica helps some, at times i will feel somewhat better for maybe a week or two and then it's get bad again.  I welcome any recommendations you have.  Thanks again

Ashley
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