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heel numbness
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heel numbness

I am a softball player and a jogger. I weigh more than I should, but I'm working on that w/the running. I have been running for a few months now.
Last week Thurs. after the game my left heel (the bottom) started going numb. I know that cleats do not give you much support, so I though it was just from playing so hard w/the cleats. But it's been a week now and it's not going away. When I jogged this week Wed. and Thurs. my whole left foot went numb and tingly. Thurs. night at the game I was physically limping after running the bases and this morning I could not put any weight on it when I got up. It seems a little better now that I'm up and moving, but it's still numb.
I really don't want to take any time off (other than a few days), I'm just starting to get back in shape.
Is it plantar fascists?
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello Dear,

Wearing non-supportive footwear on hard, flat surfaces puts abnormal strain on the plantar fascia and can also lead to plantar fasciitis. Most commonly, heel pain is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia — the tissue along the bottom of your foot that connects your heel bone to your toes. The condition is called plantar fasciitis.
Plantar fasciitis usually develops gradually, but it can come on suddenly and be severe. And although it can affect both feet, it more often occurs in only one foot at a time. Watch for: Sharp pain in the inside part of the bottom of your heel, which may feel like a knife sticking in the bottom of your foot .Heel pain that tends to be worse with the first few steps after awakening, when climbing stairs or when standing on tiptoe. Heel pain after long periods of standing or after getting up from a seated position
Conservative treatment
Nonsurgical treatments that may promote healing include:
Night splints. Your doctor may recommend wearing a splint fitted to your calf and foot while you sleep. This holds the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon in a lengthened position overnight so that they can be stretched more effectively.
Orthotics. Your doctor may prescribe off-the-shelf or custom-fitted arch supports  to help distribute pressure to your feet more evenly.
Physical theapy would help that includes stecthing exercise at the level of ankle.

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