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is is normal to have 5 vertebrae hemangiomas in T3, T4, T5, T6, and T7
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is is normal to have 5 vertebrae hemangiomas in T3, T4, T5, T6, and T7

I have been visiting many different types of doctors sent 11/07 for back pain.  I had an x-ray in 11/07 which showed multiple levels of disc degeneration in thoracic spine.  Arthritis test showed negative results except for ANA positive.  I was sent to physical therapy from 1/08-5/08 without relief.  MRI's and CT from 2/08-7/08 which showed 4 typical hemangiomas in T3, T4, T6, T7 and what they believe to be an atypical hemangioma in T5 that is 14x12x8mm.  They have requested that i come back for another mri in 6 months to a year for follow up.  I have had back pain for a while in the exact areas that they have found these but they are telling me this is not what is causing the pain.  These are the only tests they have done.  I am concerned because if they are not suppose to hurt why are they and they are not 100% that the T5 is a atypical hemangioma, the keep telling that in their opinion that that is what it is.  I have read all the reports and out of all the reports they are not sure and request more mri's and ct scans and put that they could not rule out metastatic lesion.  But do not want to do further testing.  The was some change from 2/08-3/08 but minimal change since 4/08-7/08.  Out of everything that I have read I could not find  information on multiple hemangioma in the adjacent vertebrae and having two different types.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi there.

Your condition is indeed quite rare and unique.  Normally, the general population would harbor a single hemangioma in a single vertebral segment, which is usually detected incidentally and would cause no pain.

I understand your concern due to the symptoms, and there is indeed not enough information in the medical literature on how to go about this problem.  For this reason it is important to consult specialized spine centers to have a better management.

You may also want to ask your doctors regarding hemangioma syndromes, that may be accompanied by hematologic syndromes such as low platelets and low red or white cells.  These are extremely rare and management will indeed be difficult.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you for your response.  I have been referred to a new doctor and will discuss that with them.  Thank you again for your response
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Avatar_n_tn
As with tsj101, I too have several atypical hemangiomas on my spine, 2 in thoracic area, 1 lumbar and 1 cervical.  I know that these are, in simple terms, a type of blood clot.  My question is this.  I have a bleeding disorder,  am factor VII deficient and low FVIII, If these are blood clots and I don't clot well???? How come I apparently  can clot around my spine but not too quickly or permanently  on a cut?  
I do have osteoarthritis on my spine and a few herniated discs due to degenerative disc disease.  Just mentioned those because I do not know if all that junk is related?
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Avatar_f_tn
I also show (from an MRI) multiple hemangionata's.  On T's7,8,9&10.  They said my pain isn't from them, it's from an annular tear at c5-6 and disc bulges on c3-4,c4-5, c6-7, and to top it off suspected Gall Stones.  Although I do have much pain in the cervical area, I went in with Very BAD pain just where the himangionata's are located, and I don't understand.  They said the I could have been born with the hemangionata's???, and those aren't the cause of the pain.  Does that sound right?  Is there nothing they can do for these?

Please note the different spelling, hemangionatas on my MRI report.  Is this the same thing as hemangionas?
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Avatar_f_tn
Hey, these hemangiomas are benign, so why bother?  I also have an aneurysm in my head C1, does that matter?  Are they related?

I am thinking that this is in the T5 because I fell mighly hard on my back last year right where the hemangioma is located.  My doc isn't going to give me injections for pain, right?  You say they don't hurt, but my back does in the middle and down the arm... It does say it correlates with T5  radiculopathy.

T5 much trauma
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