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is ther a connection between pernicious anemia and seizures
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is ther a connection between pernicious anemia and seizures

My father is 77 years old and up until now has been generally healthy apart from irritable bowel syndrome which has lead to suspected pernicious anemia.(We suspect it as he has the symptoms but refuses to get tested).
Three weeks ago he had a seizure in the middle of the night during which he convulsed for a few minutes
lost conciousness for a few minutes and was illucid for a few hours.
The next morning he was lucid but couldnot remember the incident.
The hospital released him without doing any tests!
Is there a recorde connection between prnicious anemia and seizures?
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9 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi, it is unlikely to be because of pernicious anemia which is mainly due to deficiency of vitamin B 12, which can lead to nervous symptoms like tingling, pins and needles, burning sensation etc. Seizure at this stage is usually due to intracranial space occupying lesion, hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis etc.

Is he diabetic, any history of hypertension? What are the medications he is on?
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Avatar_n_tn
my wife was diagnosed with anemia, iron defiency even though she takes many vitamins.
She's been taking  the minimum dosage of seroquel and depacote for 3 months because of dementia ( she's young) She recently had a seizure-
legs and eyes shaking rapidly. The doctors said this was because of the low iron level.
????????
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Avatar_dr_m_tn
Hi,
Anemia doesn’t cause seizures primarily. The causes of seizures are head injury, stroke,  tumor, conditions that irritate the brain such as injuries, medications, sleep deprivation, infections, fever or deprivation of oxygen to the brain by abnormal heart rhythms, a low level of oxygen in the blood, or a very low level of sugar in the blood. A single seizure that results from such a stimulus is called a provoked seizure (and is a nonepileptic seizure). One explanation for seizures in persons with anemia may be deprivation of blood supply to the brain and hence a low level of oxygen supply to the brain that may cause the seizures. Hope this helps you. Take care and regards!

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Avatar_f_tn
I am a 49 year old woman. I was recently diagnosed as having pernicious anemia. I also have hashimoto's thyroiditis, which I have had for 20 years. I also have petit mal seizures. I had them the same time I was having my symptoms of pernicious anemia. My neurologist insist that my seizures having nothing to do with my pernicious anemia. I do not agree. It doesn't make sense for me to get both conditions at once. I feel that I went for so long without being diagnosed with pernicious anemia that it caused my seizures. Your thoughts?
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Avatar_m_tn
I beg to differ! My daughter has nerve damage from pernicious anemia and was diagnoised due to the seizures she had until her B-12 levels were brought back up to normal with injections. Seizures are absolutely a result of pernicious anemia by way of the damage caused from this disorder. My daughter is living proof! Now that she takes weekly injections of B-12 she has gone from several seizures a day to 1 or 2 a year.
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144586_tn?1284669764
Well, to cut to the chase, siezures may be induced absolutely positively in an anoxic patient. Do not pass go. Do not collect two hundred dollars. Lack of oxygen to the brain can cause a siezure. That being said, it is rare and unlikely for anemia to reduce the oxygen levels to such a degree absent the existence of co-factors. A low hematocrit, for example, coupled with heavy smoking and saturation of the blood cells with carbon monoxide. Plus inadequate microcirculation due to atheroschlerotic deposits.  In addition different brains have different thresholds at which siezures may be induced. So the answer is "maybe yes, maybe no". In any event it is clear that a thorough neurological work-up is indicated.
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Avatar_m_tn
For anyone who reads this reply, if you are unaware… – of the names of seizures being changed and expanded back in 1981, along with the variety of epilepsies being updated in 1989;  – that there are over 40 different types of seizures and epilepsies; - that one of the steps of providing first aid for someone who's having a 'tonic clonic seizure' (old name 'grand mal seizure') is to NOT put anything in the person's mouth; …then you are not up-to-date about the medical conditions pertaining to seizure and epilepsy.
As for whether or not there's a connection between pernicious anemia and seizures, I would like to ask whoever responds to this message, to provide information and resources that proves there is absolutely no connection, whether directly or indirectly, between pernicious anemia and seizures, whatsoever. I just found out about pernicious anemia today while watching an episode of 'Mystery Diagnosis – Bizarre Visions', and plan to do some more "homework" to learn more about it.
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Avatar_f_tn
Charlie,
If you have Hashimoto's and pernicious anemia, have you been checked for celiac disease (especially if you are of European heritage)? There are close ties to celiac with both those diseases. I have Hashimoto's too with iron deficiency anemia (not pernicious), and I used to have spells when I would lose vision and pass out (not a seizure, but fainting d/t anemia). Once I was diagnosed with celiac and went on a strict gluten-free diet my anemia and passing out has all but resolved and my autothyroid antibodies have decreased 10 fold. For celiacs, the most common neurologic symptoms are seizures. Most doctors don't talk to their patients with Hashimoto's about celiac disease, but if you look up a Dr Kharrazian (author of Why do I still have thyroid symptoms when my lab tests are normal?) he believes this is tantamount to malpractice with the amount of evidence showing a connection. There is so much to be learned about the brain-gut connection, but it has indubitably been neglected!
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Avatar_m_tn
There is a strong correlation between the symptoms your father has and Celiac disease.  Don't trust what most doctors tell you about Celiac disease.  They are vastly uneducated about it, just read the plethora of horror stories on Facebook's Celiac Disease Support Group, many are taking decades of suffering to finally get diagnosed.  35 years for myself.

Seizures, pernicious anemia, and many neurological issues, in addition to the digestive issues are classic of Celiacs.  There are over 300 symptoms, but most doctors are only looking for diarrhea.
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