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pediatric syncope
Maybe someone out there can help me.  I have a 7 year old son that has had 2 syncopal episodes in a year and a half, he sees rainbows, and sometimes he says his eyes turn black.  The syncopal episodes happened both times at recess.  Our pediatrician won't do a EKG because he thinks it is a neuro problem.  He is a competitive gymnast and I worry about this stuff happening during a workout.  He is scheduled for a EEG instead.  Other than being small for his age 48 pounds, and 48 inches, small enough that he still wears 5T and size 5 clothes,, he is very healthy, and has never complained of anything.  I have a family history of the men dying of heart related issues (my father and grandfather) both at 46.  We do not know exactly what the cause was.  Other than sudden death.  My son had a "cardiac issue" when he was born, all we know is that it was a tachyarrythmia of some sort, but we have had no problems since birth with that.  After the 2 syncopal episodes, he was not nauseated, not clammy, and in general just seemed a little tired.  I don't know what to think anymore.  Has anyone been through this?????  Any advise??? I'm growing impatient with the pediatrician not refering him to a cardiologist, am I jumping the gun?

HELP, thanks
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Avatar universal
Hi, this sounds really stressful for you. I wonder if a doctor on here could reply?

Personally I don't think you're jumping the gun at all, your doctor should refer him to a cardiologist especially with the male-pattern family history of heart conditions and if he had accelerated heart beat as a baby.

Could you maybe ask again?  or go to a different doctor (i'm not in the US so don't know how the system works there), otherwise I'd say persist in trying, he's your son and you're being responsible in asking.

hope he's okay  

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Hi,
Syncope is caused by a sudden fall in blood pressure, which deprives the brain of  adequate amount of oxygen for some time.The main cardiac causes are-
Obstruction to blood flow caused by aortic valvar stenosis, primary pulmonary hypertension, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Heart rhythm abnormalities such as ventricular tachycardia, sinus node dysfunction, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or atrioventricular block.
Impaired heart function resulting from causes that are dilated cardiomyopathy, acute myocarditis, Kawasaki disease or ischemic heart disease.
Please consult a cardiologist for the investigations and diagnosis. Since your son had a heart rhythm abnormality at birth and there is a family history of heart disease, detailed cardiac investigations must be carried out. The symptoms  could have a neurological cause as well. Please go for an MRI of the brain and consult a neurologist if there is no cardiac problem. Hope this helps you. Take care and regards!  
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