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what's the difference
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what's the difference

I have unstable spondylolisthesis, disc tears at l/3 l4/ l5 and s/1,I have lost archilles reflx in left leg and suffer severe pain in left leg and foot. I had emg done last week and dr said I have pheriphial neuropathy but it is not related to any of my back problems. All my problems started at the same time and have gotten worse. Is it possible to have pheriphial neuropathy and it not be related to my back problems  or could it possibly be related Have been tested for diabetes and am fine there and all blood work turned up good.
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with a doctor.

Without the ability to examine and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of the symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

There are many ways of developing a peripheral neuropathy. One of the most common causes of neuropathy is diabetes, and sometimes only glucose intolerances, or abnormal rises in blood sugar after a glucose load can be the only indication. (This is called an oral glucose tolerance test; in these cases, the hemoglobin A1c may be within normal limits). Other causes include but are not limited to hereditary/genetic causes (such as in a disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth, in which there is a family history of sensory neuropathy usually from an early age associated with other clinical features such as high-arched feet), autoimmune problems (such as lupus (SLE), Sjogren's, Churg-Strauss (in which asthma also occurs), polyarteritis nodosa, which affects blood vessels), and demyelinating diseases (such as CIDP)). Vitamin B12 and B6 deficiency, as well as excess vitamin B6, can also cause neuropathy. Some toxins, such as lead, arsenic, and thalium can cause large fiber sensory neuropathy. Other causes include abnormalities of protein metabolism, as in a type called amyloidosis or monoclonal proteinemia.

These are just a few of the causes of a peripheral neuropathy. At times the diagnosis may not be apparent and step-wise testing may be indicated to identify the etiology of the neuropathy.  

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.
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