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Mosquito bites
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Mosquito bites

Does thiamin vitamin stop mosqito's biting humans? I am desperate to know. Have read all the bumph on lotions and potions and they do not work. Will someone please respond.
4 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar n tn
If you eat too many fruits ,and vegatables,i mean alot alot
your skin will becomes tan, just like you got out of the tanning bed, which is very good,
because your body because full of antioxidants.
your skin is full of it, so it will repel the mosquito,

i think it should work, buti am not a doctor,
dont take my adivce on it

it is only my opinion
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Avatar n tn
Certain companies have used Thiamine in their lotion formulas to some success. Whether or not internal Thiamine use might prevent mosquito/tick bites still comes with debate. It might be worth a try for you?

If you're on your way to the islands, South America, or Mexico, DO NOT COME INTO CONTACT WITH THE WATER. Don't even brush your teeth with it. Personally, I wouldn't even bath in it, to be honest.

My brother and his family traveled there recently and they all came down with Giardiasis. Another couple ended up with Malaria, another individual developed T. Cruzi, and that's going to be a chronic problem.

Bottomline is that everyone that's gone there over the past three years that I know has come down with a parastic infection, all of which could have been prevented by avoiding the water supply.  

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Avatar n tn
Thanks for that I will give it a try. There is nothing worse than going on the holiday of your dreams only to end up with golf ball size lumps all over your body, and when you come home you itch for months.
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Avatar n tn
Where did you get your information? It is quite humorous, and I think we all can tell that you are not a doctor. Your skin will become tan from too many fruits and vegetables?! Wow, that's just simply amazing. P.S. I'm being sarcastic in the last sentence.

When you get a tan, what is actually happening is that the melanocytes are producing melanin pigment in reaction to ultraviolet light in sunlight. (not food) Ultraviolet light stimulates melanin production. The pigment has the effect of absorbing the UV radiation in sunlight, so it protects the cells from UV damage. Melanin production takes a fair amount of time -- that is why most people cannot get a tan in one day. You have to expose yourself to UV light for a short period of time to activate the melanocytes. They produce melanin over the course of hours. By repeating this process over 5 to 7 days pigment builds up in your cells to a level that is protective.
The previous paragraph applies to Caucasians. In a variety of other races, melanin production is continuous, so the skin is always pigmented to some degree. In these races the incidence of skin cancer is much lower because cells are constantly protected from UV radiation by melanin.

Melanocytes actually produce two different pigments: eumelanin (brown) and phaeomelanin (yellow and red). Red heads happen to produce more phaeomelanin and less eumelanin, which is why they don't tan very well. In albinos, the chemical pathway that produces melanin cannot proceed because an enzyme called Tyrosinase is missing. Therefore albinos have no melanin in their skin, hair or irises.

Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) is produced by the pituitary gland. MSH flows through the bloodstream and reaches the melanocytes, encouraging them to produce more melanin (for example, a person injected with a large dose of MSH will get darker). The pituitary gland is actually quite interesting -- it is tied into the optic nerve, which means that it can sense light. If you have ever raised chickens for eggs, you know that in the winter egg production falls way off. You solve this problem by providing light in the chicken coop. The extra light stimulates the pituitary gland in chickens, which causes the gland to produce a hormone essential to egg laying. In humans, light affects the pituitary gland as well and one result is the production of MSH. A funny side-effect of all of this is that wearing sunglasses may make you more susceptible to sunburn! See this page for some thoughts on the subject.

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