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Vitamins B12 and D
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Vitamins B12 and D

I have been diagnosed as borderline b12 deficient and have been getting b12 injections for several months.  My level has gone up and then back down with the different frequencies my doctor has been trying.  The extremity numbness and tingling improves after I get a shot but by the end of the month starts to come back.  I generally wake up several times at night with arms totally asleep.

I saw a specialist who didn't think my level was low enough to cause problems and suggested I had a pinched nerve causing my tingling.  But would a pinched nerve affect both arms and legs?  I've had some other ongoing issues that I've tried for years to find a cause, but no doctor has found anything. Most of which can be caused by low b12 and/or vit D levels.

Has anyone read the book "Could it be B12"?  I was recommended to read it and did and thought some info was incredibly useful, but don't know if it's accurate.

My doctor insists that the cyanocobalamin is fine, when the book states that methyl cobalamin or hydroxocobalamin is better.  She is willing to treat due to symptoms in the "gray" area so I don't want to complain.  Also I'm curious why if some countries state that symptoms may be felt in some patients if their level is below 500-550, why my doctors say it doesn't matter where you are in the range as long as you are in the range.  

On that theory, shouldn't they be just as happy to get me to the top of the range so I could see if I feel better?

My final question is actually about my vit D level.  It was a 10.2 and my doctor has now put me on 1X weekly 50,000IU.  I've read you need other cofactors (magnesium, vitamin K, etc.) to help the vit D.  I was taking 2,000IU daily that had these components, but my 50,000IU doesn't have them.  So, do I just take the same amount of these as was in my daily or do I need more to correspond to the much higher dose of vit D I'm now taking?  Are these things safe at higher doses?

Are you (or the subject of the question) male or female?
:  
Female
What is your (or the subject of the question) height?
:  
5'5"
What is your (or the subject of the question) weight (kg or lb)?
:  
160
267079_tn?1195146570

Blood work levels are normal within a certain range regardless where in the range they are at. The normal range of Vitamin B12 is from160-950pg/ml. Reason for such wide range is due to Vitamin B12 is in our tissues plus in the blood so it is difficult to have a true reading. There is a factor in our stomach that we need for Vitamin B12 to work. If that is not present, pernicious anemia occurs and we become vitamin B12 deficient. Supplementation is used for mild vitamin B12 deficiency, such as, with chronic alcoholism, therapy for gastric acid inhibitors, vegan vegetarians, autoimmune disorders, or dementia. Vitamin B12 shots are the best method of treatment and normal treatment is once a month. Your blood levels are monitored while you are receiving injections. Some people have low vitamin B12 levels due to folate deficiency. Which you did not mentioned your levels. There are no adverse effects associated with Vitamin B12 intake from food and/ or supplementation. If you are really concerned then Vitamin B12 can be easily consumed from our diet. One egg a day (yes, it does have cholesterol, however, it is the good cholesterol our body needs), ½ chicken breast, and 1 cup low fat milk, to name a few vitamin B12 sources would help increase the vitamin. Folic Acid / Folate normal blood reference is 5-25 ng/ml.You can get extra folate  by eating the foods high in it, such as, raw spinach, orange, romaine lettuce, peanut butter, nonfat milk, and raisin bran cereal. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means the vitamin goes into our fat cells and the body does not excrete it. It is a required vitamin for our body to stay healthy as all the other vitamins and minerals are necessary. Vitamin D may decrease from certain medications such as certain anti-seizure, corticosteroids, heparin, certain antibiotics, mineral oil, and antacids; or certain disease states such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease and Whipple’s disease. 2000 IU is the tolerable upper intake level for adults. Vitamin D is available through our foods - Fortified milk, breakfast cereals, egg yolks, fatty fish, and fish oils. Hoped this helped you.
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