Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Expert Forum
Bump on hard palate
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Questions in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery forum are answered by Dr. Michael H Kirsch and Dr. Mario Tuchman. Topics covered include teeth extractions, wisdom teeth, dental implants, bone grafting, orthognathic surgery, facial bones realignment, facial trauma repair, jaw alignment, anesthesia , jaw cyst or tumor diagnosis, reconstructive jaw surgery, temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ) and TMJ surgery.

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Bump on hard palate

Thank you in advance for your time. I am 24 years old (male) and a non-smoker/drinker. Recently, I had a sore on my lip due to an apparent virus I was fighting. I seem to always stroke my hard palate with my tongue as a nervous habit; last night I did so, and felt a slightly raised 'bump' on the right side of my hard palate. It is about the size of the head of a match (maybe even smaller) and is fixed and hard (it is not painful; however, when I touch it with my finger, there is a slight sensation). It appears to be slightly red in color. To my knowledge, it has been there for 2 days now, as I am certain I would have felt it before. I am currently trying to get in to see a dentist, but am now emotionally drained from stressing myself out. I am wondering if this could be caused from a virus. Also, is this how a tumor would present? Thanks a lot.
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What you have described may represent several things.  Traumatically induced lesions are the most common followed by inflammatory.  Infectious is certainly one but I would not be too quick to worry as auto-innoculation of the herpes virus of the lip to inside of the palate is unlikely.

Minor salivary gland lesions are uncommon in your age.

Generally, traumatic lesion spontaneouly heal within 7-10 days.  If the lesion persists for more than two weeks, is rapidly enlarging or causing pain, then I would see out an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon for evaluation.  Persistent lesions without explanation should be biopsied.

A final thought is that you may be getting a palatine torus which is a benign enlargement of normal bone.  Again, the surgeon would be able to tell after a clinical exam.

Information contained within this reply is intended solely for general educational purposes and is not intended nor implied to be a medical diagnosis or treatment recommendation.  This is not a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your own doctor for medical condition. Only your doctor can provide specific diagnoses and therapies.
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373693_tn?1324489102
Michael H Kirsch, DDSBlank
Dr. Michael H. Kirsch
Caldwell, NJ
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