Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Expert Forum
What to do with damaged post tooth for bridge?
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Questions in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery forum are answered by Dr. Michael H Kirsch and Dr. Mario Tuchman. Topics covered include teeth extractions, wisdom teeth, dental implants, bone grafting, orthognathic surgery, facial bones realignment, facial trauma repair, jaw alignment, anesthesia , jaw cyst or tumor diagnosis, reconstructive jaw surgery, temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ) and TMJ surgery.

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What to do with damaged post tooth for bridge?

Hello Dr.

  I had an 18 year-old six-tooth upper front bridge replaced two weeks ago with a nice zirconium/porcelain bridge.  Two post teeth on the upper right (#6 and #7) needed root canals.  The dentist who re-filled the teeth and prepared them to act as posts again apparently drilled somewhat at an angle on #6, so the post material protrudes slightly out the side of #6, facing #7.

  Apparently not realizing this, the dentist installed the bridge 10 days ago.  Then swelling and an infection occurred in the gum between #6 an #7.  I'm taking antibiotics and the infection is healing.

  Is it possible for a surgeon to open the gum, drill down the protruding filling on #6 and somehow repair that tooth?  Or, is it possible to cut just the end tooth on the bridge (#6), then extract #6, insert a temporary flipper, and then later see if an implant would be viable there?

  Any other suggestions?

  Thank you,

  Duane
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373693_tn?1324489102
Your question poses many different responses.  If the tooth is perforated by the post and this is the cause of the infection, then extraction will be the most likely remedy.

Certainly dental implants are one treatment alternative but tooth removal is considered the last resort to eliminate the disease or preserve the remaining bone.

I am glad to hear you are feeling better but I am concerned the antibiotics may simply mask the problem which requires a procedure.

Without a clinical exam and radiographs it is impossible to render a diagnosis and thus a workable treatment plan.

Your instinct to see an oral surgeon is correct.  They would be able to provide you with a complete diagnosis and treatment alternatives.

Information contained within this reply is intended solely for general educational purposes and is not intended nor implied to be a medical diagnosis or treatment recommendation.  This is not a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Always seek the advice of your own doctor for medical condition. Only your doctor can provide specific diagnoses and therapies.
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Michael H Kirsch, DDSBlank
Dr. Michael H. Kirsch
Caldwell, NJ
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