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Army son has Enchondroma in the left tibia....
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Army son has Enchondroma in the left tibia....

My son who is 20 yrs old and in the Army has Enchondroma in his left tibia.  He has had MRI and a total skeleton Bone Scan which confirm he has a 3.1 cm Enchondroma in his tibia.  The problem he is having pain in his leg.  The Orthopedic says he shouldn’t have any pain in his leg from the Enchondroma and he might have shin splints or shin fractures.  This was in March 2012.  He has had x-rays and MRI showing no fractures in his shins.  The pain will not go away and now the Army doctors have placed him on crutches since August 2012.   The Army believes just gives this young boy’s 800 mg motion and crutches and this will fix everything. NOT!

As a mother of an Army son who lives  3000 miles away  please help me find some better answers to his medical problem.  

Medical information:

MRI 12/17/11
A sclerotic lesion seen radiographically in the endosteal compartment of the left tibial disphysis is also seen MR.  It consists of a somewhat irregular pattern of heterogeneous low T1 and low T2 weighted signal intensity.  There is no adjacent surrounding marrow edma. No periosteal reaction is seen. Cortical and medullary bone aignal intensity are otherwise normal. No soft tissue mass or cyst is seen. There is no evidence of stress fracture or stress injury.  The lesion in the proximal tibial diaphysis is felt to be most compatible with a focus of fibrous dysplasia.

Doctors assessment from the Orthopedics doctor 03/12/12

X-rays from today, AP and lateral of his left tib-fib were compared to AP and lateral x-rays from December 6, 2011 shows an eccentric, posteriorly situated bone lesion that looks heavily mineralized and at least partially involving the posterior cortex.  This looks like it is probably an old healed nonossifying fibroma.  Less likely it could be a benign Enchondroma.  

MRI shows that this has heavy area of low signal within the center that are more suggestive of an old nonossifying fibroma.  There is a portion that appears to have involved the cortex, although this is completely healed in.  There is some extension to the medullary cavity. Some of this does have a bit of a brighter nodular signal, sequences that may represent cartilage.

ASSESSMENT:
1. Bone lesion left tibial diaphysis, eccentrically situated with some mineralization. Differential diagnosis includes nonossifying, fibroma (healed) versus Enchondroma.
2. Left lower leg shin splints (tibial periostitis)


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I wish I could help! I have an enchondroma in my left femur. Pain started over a period of 3 months and worsened every month. I have had tons of scans and every doctor says that the enchondroma isn't causing the pain. They are wrong plain and simple. I woke up one day in pain and it is so bad that I cannot walk without strong pain medication. Going to a pain clinic can help. I am also looking into going to a very large hospital with a world renown orthopedic surgeon who specializes in bone tumors. I hope he gets help. I take MS Contin everyday to help. God bless!
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