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Does straight leg raise mean anything in a cast?
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Does straight leg raise mean anything in a cast?

A week ago, I fell and fractured my patella in half and slightly displaced it. My doctor asked me to perform a straight leg raise, and I could not. So, he said my tendon, or "sleeve", was most likely ruptured and I would need surgery. Today, a week later, I went in for a follow up, and he asked me to perform a straight leg raise again, and this time I did, and he said I may not need surgery. However, I am in a hard cast from my upper thigh to my toes; so my question is, does being able to do the leg raise really mean anything? The cast is supporting my leg, it's my hip doing all the work.
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1711789_tn?1361311607
Hi there!

Yes, it does. Well, this is slightly more complex than what we assume. The same muscle (quadriceps) that causes the knee to be straight (extend) causes the hip to bend (flex). When in a long leg cast, it’s only the movement at the knee joint that would not be possible to evaluate; however the ability to raise the leg when straight/ flex the hip can be tested, to evaluate the function of the muscle/ tendon.
Hope this is helpful.

Take care!
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Avatar_f_tn
My leg isn't completely straight though, it's slightly bent at the knee. Does that change anything?
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1711789_tn?1361311607
Hi there!

If the leg it still in a cast, it does not make a difference. If out of the cast and you can’t straighten your leg completely at the knee, but can raise the leg at the hip; this could indicate a muscle weakness/ stiffness as occurs after a period of immobilization or minor injury to the tendon, inflammation or related causes. This is likely to respond well to conservative management, not usually requiring a surgical intervention. You may like to discuss this in detail with your doctor.
Hope this helps.

Take care!
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