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Problem after knee hyperextension
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Problem after knee hyperextension

3 years ago I hyper-extended my left knee running at full speed.  Another player cut in front of me and my left leg was hyper-extended and "bowed out" to the left side.  

An MRI was performed and found only that the LCL was torn.  The proximal fibular head was painful and was prominently sticking out.  There was pain on the fibular head and I was unable to bend my big toe.  There was also nerve tingling from the knee down.  It hurt/ still hurts, to flex my lower leg.  There is tightness in my lateral biceps femoris.  I went to physical therapy for a month without any improvements.  

About a year ago I made a strange movement at work and a loud pop was heard well outside of the room and down the hall.  Immediately I felt relief in the area with regards to the tingling sensation and was able to bend my big toe.  It felt like my fibula shifted down.  The prominence of the fibular head decreased, but is still more promenent than the other side.  After about a month the hamstring tightness decreased.

Now my symptoms are occasional popping on or near the fibular head when playing basketball.  I still have weakness in my biceps femoris and pain much milder pain when flexing it.  The worse is a grinding and popping sound that I've had when climbing stairs and doing lunges over my left leg.  

In my research this seems consistent with a proximal tibiofibular dislocation, but my orthopaedic doc seems to think I just need to rub dirt on it and get over it.  

Any suggestions?
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Avatar_dr_m_tn
Without any diagnosis it is difficult to come to a conclusion. Your orthopaedician while examining will easily know if it would have been a dislocation.

If it bothers you,  you have to go for an X-ray to find out if you have any dislocaction and assess the case on the present condition.

Your orthopaedician can correlate the clinical findings with the X-ray and come to a diagnosis.

Take care!
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