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bipartite patella
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bipartite patella

I am a 17 yr. old athlete with knee pain in both knees. The pain started in only my left knee, but I have recently noticed increased pain in my right knee. I have been to three different doctors and none of them have come to the same conclusion. They all do agree however that I have a bipartite patella in my left knee. They say that I have had it since birth. I was wondering that if you have a bipartite patella in one knee is it likely to have it in the other knee also. If so this would perhaps explain my right knee pain along with my left knee pain. I have not yet been seen for my right knee pain, but all three of the doctors that I have seen say that my bipartite patella should not be causing my pain. They say my pain is related to something else, but none of my doctors can tell me what it is. I really would like to know if my bipartite patella could be causing my pain! I mean something has to be causing my pain and so far that is the only problem that they have found with my knee. I wish to learn more about bipartite patella, so if anyone has any information I would greatly like to hear it. Thank-you
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Hello sportysoftballchic23,

In your case it seems that the bipartite patella is causing inflammation around the soft tissue and resulting in the pain. The following information would help.

A bipartite patella occurs when the patella, or kneecap, occurs as two separate bones. Instead of fusing together in early childhood, the patella remains separated. A bipartite patella is usually not a problem; it occurs in at least 1 percent of the population, and perhaps more. In some people who have a bipartite patella, the fibrous tissue that connects the pieces of bone can become inflamed and irritated. The tissue that connects the two parts of bone is called a synchondrosis. A symptomatic bipartite patella is usually the result of a minor trauma or injury, but the knee pain persists. In most cases, no treatment is needed for patients diagnosed with a bipartite patella. In the few patients who develop persistent symptoms as a result of their bipartite patella, there are surgical treatment options. The surgery usually consists of removing the smaller fragment of bone or detaching the muscle that inserts on the smaller piece of bone

Refer: http://orthopedics.about.com/od/kneecappatelladisorders/g/bipartite.htm

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