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trigger finger
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trigger finger

I have been diagnosed with trigger finger (middle finger).  I only have a problem with it when I wake up in the morning.
Is there a downside to ignoring it for now?  Will ignoring it for now cause worse problems later?
Thanks.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello Dear
A trigger finger occurs when the motion of the tendon that opens and closes the finger is limited, causing the finger to lock or catch as the finger is extended.
Tendons that control the movements of the fingers and thumb slide through a snug tunnel of tissue created by a series of pulleys that keeps the tendon in place. The tendon can become irritated as it slips through the tunnel. As it becomes more and more irritated, the tendon may thicken, making its passage through the tunnel more difficult. The tissues that hold the tendon in place may thicken, causing the opening of the tunnel to become smaller. As a result, the tendon becomes momentarily stuck at the mouth of the tunnel as the finger is extended. A pop may be felt as the tendon slips past the tight area. This why pain and catching may be felt as the finger is moved.
Symptoms of trigger finger usually start without any injury. Symptoms may include the presence of a small lump, pain in the palm, swelling, and a catching or popping sensation in the finger or thumb joints.

If symptoms are mild, resting the finger may be enough to resolve the problem. Over-the-counter pain medications can be used to relieve the pain. Splints are sometimes used to rest the finger.
A physician may choose to inject a corticosteroid. Sometimes, the improvement is temporary and more than one injection may be needed. Injections are less likely to provide permanent relief when the triggering has been present for a long time, or if when there is an associated medical problem like diabetes
Trigger finger is not a dangerous condition. The decision whether to proceed with surgery is a personal one, based on how severe the symptoms are. If the finger is stuck in a bent position, surgery may be recommended to prevent permanent stiffness.
Take care
Best
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Avatar_n_tn
Trigger finger  is quite common and cortisone injections are fast, easy and often work.  Sometimes it may take 2 or 3 of them. Usually if 3 don't work then surgery is recommended. We do several of these in a day-very common.
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Avatar_n_tn
Well, I had the surgery this morning.
Just a quick question: because of my (and my doctor's) vacations, I won't be able to have the stitches out for two weeks.  Will that cause a problem?
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Avatar_f_tn
My mom had surgery a few weeks ago and she was worried about her stiches too but she had them out in 15 days later her doctor said that they could be in from 2 weeks to a month so theres nothing to worry about ,
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Avatar_n_tn
It's about 9 months since I had the operation and, while the finger no longer triggers, it lost a certain range of motion; I can only bend it back part way.  Rehab didn't help.
Beats triggering but was not the result I hoped for.
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