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5 year old with OCD??
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5 year old with OCD??

My daughter will be 5 in december. She's recently been acting out more and its getting really difficult. I also have a 2.5 month old. At first I thought it was just the change of having a new baby in the house but it seems a bit exessive. I started trying to figure out triggers etc. She gets mad when she doesn't get what she wants (normal kid thing), she doesn't like the less attention due to baby and work (I can understand it but try to do what I can to fix it). But the one that stands out it organization. She is very particular about ho w certain things are organized. Last night she was told to clean up toys ar my friends house. My friend told her just to put it all in a box. It was mostly lincoln logs but a few plastic chain link toys. My daughter threw a fit because the chain links "didn't belong I'm there". We both told her that it didn't matter, that's how their toys are kept. My daughter complately flipped out. She would not put them in the box. We tried punishing her but she just ignored it and went back to panicking that they didn't belong. I plan on taking her to the doc. I'm sure its going to be OCD because her dad has it, but mild case. How do you cope and/or deal with it? How do you differentiate what is cased by the ocd and what's not? I've never dealt with this kind of thing. Also drugs aren't an option to me, so not sure a doctor can help much. And the tantrum I mentioned isn't the first time its happened, it was just the most recent.
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5914096_tn?1399922587
It sounds like you have a strong willed child, not necessarily OCD.  Just because she ignores the discipline isn't a reason not to discipline.  Discipline doesn't change behavior.  Your child needs to want to change her behavior.  Discipline acts as an incentive for behavioral change.  Give your daughter a 5 minute timeout per misbehavior and be consistent with it.  Do not over analyze her behavior.  It is what it is - misbehavior.  Discipline it consistently and this situation should resolve itself.
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973741_tn?1342346373
I would keep an eye on her and talk to your pediatrician about it.  Is the fit she had on things going in the wrong place upsetting her typical?  It is a bit of an over the top reaction---  could she have been tired too?  some kids hold it together and then lose it at the end when they've held it together for just a bit too long.  

OCD can indeed show itself in kids.  I'd watch and just kind of chart things and if you see it becoming common place, talk to your pediatrition about a referral to a child psychologist.  We have one, for example, in our city where children with OCD is their primary focus of their practice and she does a fantastic job of helping kids overcome this.  

Now, I had a rule with my kids----  if they scream or throw a fit, wherever we are, whatever we are doing, we leave immediately.  Kids HATE this.  She may not have finished cleaning up the toys but the walk of shame to the car would have said something to her about what is acceptable behavior and what is not.  When my two year old threw a fit at the grocery store for example---  I left my cart and walked him out of the store.  When he asked for juice later he heard 'oh, I'm so sorry.  We don't have juice because we had to leave the grocery store when you threw a fit.  No juice.  So sorry."  It really did work with my boys.  If they hollered in the car (I have two boys very close in age), I pulled over and stopped driving.  I didn't say a word.  I sat quietly.  They'd quickly notice and immediately stop arguing or being too loud with one another.  My kids really learned pretty quickly with that that yelling in the car or fighting distracts the driver and they shouldn't do it.  They don't to this day.  

I try to always be consistent  and never threaten something I won't follow through with.  

But I really do think a huge part of this is the new sibling.  That is still a new situation and just think how much that changes her world.  I would try very hard to catch her doing things right and praise her, reward her for good behavior, and try to plan some one on one time with her.  Getting a new sibling is one of the biggest changes a young child can go through.  

best of luck to you
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13167_tn?1327197724
She sounds like my niece,  who is now 27.  She has a shirt that says "I have CDO.  It's like OCD,  but in proper alphabetical order as it should be".  ;D

We're all variations on a theme,  penguin.  Some people are really messy,  some people are exceptionally organized but those differences can still be in the "normal" spectrum.

OCD is diagnosed not by behaviors like this - but when rituals and compulsions get in the way of everyday living.  I don't think the occasional loss of temper because someone is making her do something disorderly needs to be treated.

There are people with OCD who can't function normally.  Their rituals and demands for certain things to be done in a certain order keeps them from leaving the house,  getting in the car,  getting to school,  etc.  

If you keep an eye on it and her desire to create a neat order of things doesn't interfere with her life,  it's just a part of her personality.

BTW,  I am at the other end of the spectrum and we had big bins of toys too that everything just got thrown in so I guess I appreciate a child with a desire to bring order.
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973741_tn?1342346373
The rituals or compulsion are typically the compensation factor for the anxiety associated with OCD.  

I have one son who I do worry about OCD down the road.  When overstressed, he has to do things three times. Touch the dashboard 3 times before going into our house.  he can't touch anything with his middle or his 'bad' finger and if he does, he has to do whatever it was he was doing all over again.  Happens infrequently though so we are not working on that at this point.  We do work on relaxation strategies and overcoming any anxiety that he suffers as well as keeping his sensory issues under control through his activities he does for that.  But I'm not in denial that his compulsions at times are something to be aware of.  We actually overcame something that he was having trouble with---  he had to be 'even' for a time.  This meant that if he touched something on one side of his body, he had to touch the other side of his body too and it wasn't okay until he did that.  Ugh, hard to write about because clearly this sent my mama warning bells off.  It wasn't getting in the way of life per say because my son is smart and can hide these types of things from others very well.  Anyway, we read a book for kids on OCD.  It was great.  It talked about kids do these things because of a fear and the compulsion makes them feel safe.  Exactly was my son's response to that.  So, he muscled through trying to see what would happen if he didn't do his go to safe activity (the touching an object with both sides of his body).  Wa la.  he found he was fine.  This little exercise is something he himself uses all the time when he starts to feel like he needs to do something that is a compulsion.  

I only share this as some kids indeed have OCD.

This is different than my other son that must have his things in order.  I mean really, if you need your closet or drawers organized, call him.  he's a super helper and keeps things very neat and likes things in a very specific spot and will give you heck if you move them.  He is unhappy  if things aren't in order.  But I wouldn't say he has OCD.

That is how I see the difference.  One uses the compulsions to feel safe and the other just likes things neat and tidy.  
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