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DS' pediatrician appointment today
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DS' pediatrician appointment today

To make a long story short.....

DS will be 3 at the beginning of October.  At his 2 year appointment with our GP, we mentioned that we had noticed that his speech wasn't quite on par with other kids his age (fewer words, not yet stringing 2 words together).  He sent us to an audiologist for a hearing test (which checked out fine) and referred us to a local children's centre where they deal with all sorts of behavioral/developmental issues.

We waited 5 months for an assessment - by then, DS' vocabulary had improved (he had well over 50 words, but still wasn't really stringing much together).  The result of the assessment was a referral to an early language development playgroup.  He went to that in July (by which time he was showing even more improvement, initiating more, repeating many more words and finally starting to string 2 words together).  The session was just 6 classes, 45 minutes long each.  We had a follow up appointment, and instead of talking soley about his speech and how he'd progressed in the class, the speech pathologist started talking about how they were going to refer him to occupational therapy because he "couldn't sit still" and some sort of transitions class.  First of all, our son is not all over the place:  he had eye surgery at 2 weeks of age and, as a result wears either contacts or glasses - sometimes he needs to get closer to things to see them better.  Secondly, toddlers have short attention spans....can they be expected to sit completely still, especially when they are not interested in the topic (the classes had themes, and DS wasn't "into" all of them)?

So, they also recommended an overall assessment be done by a pediatrician, which is where we went today.  The doctor and his resident asked us several questions and then interacted with DS - had DS colour for them, give them five, follow some simple directions, etc.  Lately, DS has been talking a lot more, even stringing 3-4 words together and he was doing that for them.  The pediatrician said that, aside from his speech delay (which doesn't concern him due to the fact that he's progressing), all he saw was a normal little boy.  He was worried about autism from reading the report that the children's centre sent but saw no evidence of anything out of the ordinary and says that he doesn't want to see him for another year - and that's just going to be a general check-up for progress.  

Deep in our hearts, DH and I have felt that DS is ok, just a bit slower to express himself verbally, and it felt good to have the pediatrician confirm that today!  We understand that the children's centre just wanted to "cover all of the bases" or whatever and that it's been in DS' best interest to have all of this checked out, but it is a bit disconcerting that, when a child doesn't fit into the mold and a certain facet of their development isn't exactly in line with a perceived notion of what is "normal", flags are raised and the worries start to build and fester.  It just seems that there is so much pressure on parents - and kids - these days!!
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Well,  I wouldn't be angry with the speech pathologist.  Here is why,  what benefit is it to them to suggest that something more is going on with your son?  My son has a delay called sensory integration disorder which is involves his nervous system.  He is extremely intelligent (always above his peers acedemically) and met every single developmental milestone.  He behaved well at home and was very lovable.  But sensory integration became appearent during his preschool years.  A very astute teacher brought my attention to it when he was almost 3 when he only attended one half day a week.  She stated that he was difficult to understand (articulation) speech wise and tripped a lot.  My boy is rambunctious but played baseball where he hit like a champ, soccer, all kinds of very coordinated activities.  I was stunned.  But I allowed their couselor to observe my child for 3 class sessions (again, one half day each).  She is the one who told me she believed he had sensory integration and that we should get an evaluation.  I was angry and confused and didn't believe it.  We did the evaluation----  it came back that he was fine.   I felt so so so good as you can imagine.  By half way through the next school year (two half days a week)----  it was very clear.  He was 4 at this time.  He didn't function well in school at all.  I went to observe him and what hurt the most was the look on his face.  I knew then that I needed an evaluation to  help him.  We did another at a top occupational therapy institute in our city and it was determined he had this delay.  It is mild.  I feel like I owe the world to those teachers that caught my child's difference early.  We started occupational therapy and my son is so so so much happier.  He does very well in school with regards to behavior and his comfort level with his peers.  Early intervention made the world of difference.  
My point of telling you this is that I had NO idea that my child had a delay until someone pointed it out to me.  Speech problems are often the first sign of a delay.  While I don't know your child or you and trust that you have your child's best interest at heart---  just watch him over the next year.  As he enters preschool, you will be able to tell.  Behavior that is outside the norm is important to note.  Schools don't expect kids to be cookie cutters but stacking your child up against others by people who deal with multiple children on a regular basis is very telling.  If your child is too far outside the "norm"---- there is a reason.  You do not want that for your child.  
Your child may have just had a general delay of speech and is catching up----  I hope so.  But if not, it is not the end of the world.  I appreciate your venting----  I was exactly in your shoes.  You'll know more when he is older (in about a year or so)----  but watch until then.  If I had taken your attitude------  my child would not be where he is today.  I thank god for the people that were honest with me.
Enjoy every minute of your son----  this may be a blip in his life or you may be revisiting the issue later.  Either way----  it will be okay!
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I think you totally misunderstood my post (and, as you say, my "attitude") as is proven by your statement "If I had taken your attitude------  my child would not be where he is today.  I thank god for the people that were honest with me." I'm not "angry" - but DH and I have been frustrated by the whole process thus far: there's a difference.

It's not like we didn't pursue this at all, believing that the speech pathologists we've seen were not right when they raised concerns - we have been observing our son, seeing many improvements which have also been noted by others who know him and now a pediatrician has observed him and now even a pediatrician has evaluated him.

We will continue to work with him and make note of his progress.  
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now even a pediatrician has evaluated him

If I'm not being too intrusive, did the pediatrician offer any advice/suggestions?  I'll understand if you choose not to answer ....
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He indicated that, based on his observations, the speech delay (which appears to be resolving itself) is unrelated to any other condition.  We have been working with him (using flash cards, etc.) and are prepared to pursue additional speech therapy if it's warranted that it's required.  While a speech delay can be indicative of a more serious underlying problem, he said that's not always the case:  some children just are slower to talk than others.  My DH was 3 before he really started talking himself, in fact.....
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I'm sorry Limonada,  I didn't mean to suggest you have a lax attitude regarding your son.  You certainly don't----  you've pursued speech therapy for him and then followed up with a pediatrician.  Your pediatrician alleviated your concerns.  I guess I was just trying to say that when it comes to kids it is best to be on guard so that we can help them.  And they really can do incredible things with kids.  Since you've had mixed impressions of your son by various professionals, I just thought it would be prudent to keep an eye on it as he gets older and more is expected of him.  School will be very telling for him.

And I don't suggest that every child that has a speech delay has a further delay.  What I was reacting to was that I was almost in the exact situation at one time.  I WAS miffed at the people that said my son had a delay as I didn't see it and resented that he was said to have this just because he was a little different.  In my case, I wasted some time  and his self esteem took a hit during that period.  I didn't ignore his issues either----  I followed up with the evaluations they recommended and initially they told me they didn't see it (an occupational therapist).  But he was only 3.  It became clearer at 4.  So I was reassured by a professional that all was well.
Your story just rang a bell and I was just trying to say, watch your son closely.  Like I said, my son is night and day different and functions really well in school now.  He's so much happier---- so his diagnosis of a delay was a blessing for my family.
I again, hope that your son has no further delay and just started talking late.  (by the way, my younger son who is 4 has some articulation problems-----  he will have some speech help with this, but he shows no other signs of delay.  He attends preschool and they see nothing nor do I after being a hawk eye for it since my older son.  So I do know that speech issues just  "happen")  
Again, I really apologize for offending  you.
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