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not talking much at 22 months
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not talking much at 22 months

hi, i have a 22 month old, and i am beginning to worry because he really isnt talking that much. he does say please, thank you, ma, da, no. my other two children were talking alot more then these at the same age. is there anything to worry about or should i contact someone in like infants and toddlers program? by the way he does understand everything that you say to him. he was a little slow with walking and sitting up all so.
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Avatar_f_tn
I know exactly how you feel. Your child is actually doing better then mine. My son just turned two on the 16th of November and he hasn't said more then "ball" and "bath" and he even says those with a funny accent. He can't say daddy or mama, or anything else for that matter. He just uses baby talk still. He does understand everything you say. He can point to his nose, ear, lips, eyes and toes. If you ask him to do things he'll do them like throw something away, find shoes, find cup, etc. He also is very good at communicating what he wants (or maybe I am good at guessing lol). The doctor has suggested speech therapy if he doesn't start talking in three months, so that might be something you want to consider or ask your doctor about. He also mentioned autism but said it isn't likely the case if your child is very responsive to you.

If he had trouble walking and sitting up maybe he is just a slow bloomer. My son sat up, crawled, and walked all at a very average time, exactly when everyone was starting to say he needs to be doing that. He has met every mile stone, except for talking, at his own pace and in good time. So maybe your son just needs to do things at his own pace. I actually think that saying as much as he does at 22 months is probably very normal, but a doctor would know for sure.
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117065_tn?1280878007
Hello- I just read your post and what you are going through with your son sounds a lot like what I went through with mine.  These were his milesones:

Rolling front to back-6 mo
Rolling back to front- 7 mo
Sitting up-9 mo
Crawling- 11 mo
Pulling up to standing- 11 mo
first step- 15 mo
walking all the time- 17 mo
at two years old he had less then 10 single words, by two they should be putting two and three word phrases together.

My son suffers from a condition called Hypotonia, which literally means poor muscle tone, from head to toe.  It affects his fine motor, gross motor and speech.  I would definatly contact your pediatrician and ask about some early intervention- get your little guy evaluated so if he needs the help he can get it sooner rather than later.  If I had to take a guess- I would say your little man is going to need some assistance to get his speech going.  Good luck!  If you have any other questions or would just like to chat please feel free to contact me.
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Avatar_f_tn
he is the third child so he really doesn't need to say much, his siblings talked earlier because they had to, to get your attention. Yet being the baby makes it easier for him to get what he needs without verbalizing, the fact that he says please and thank you are very good signs they are hard words for a child to say. My daughter is 26 mths and is now finally talking the way i thought she should be. At 24mths she only said mine, no,kitty, momma, dadda, and bubba. so rest assured his vocabulary will come sooner than you think!
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Avatar_n_tn
I think being the youngest of 3 makes it easier for him to get things without talking.  Plus, how can he get a word in with the other two! lol  I wouldn't worry much, my cousin didn't say anything except "no" until after she was 2 and she has now graduated university and is a very intelligent lady.  Keep encouraging words and talking and if he doesn't answer questions or say what he wants don't give it to him.  For example, don't hand him things when he points at them etc.  Encourage him to ask, even if it's only please ma at first.  He'll get there, if he's reaching all his other milestone's within an acceptable range I would just say he's slow to talk.  That's not uncommon in young boys.  
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Avatar_n_tn
MY SON IS HAVING THE SAME PROBLEM , HE TURNED 3 IN OCTOBER. HE WAS EVAL THROUGH THE SCHOOLS AND GETS SOME SPEECH THERAPY. HE STILL REFUSES TO SAY ANY SENTENCES. BUT HIS VOCABULARY HAS IMPROVED.  IT SCARES ME THOUGH.
HE IS VERY STUBBORB, THEY TELL ME AT DAY CARE HE SAYS "MORE JUICE" AT HOME HE WILL ONLY SAY "JUICE". IF I PUSH IT AND SAY MOMMY SAYS SAY" MORE JUICE " , HE GETS MAD.
SOMETIMES I FEEL LIKE I DID SOMETHING WRONG.
HE SAYS THINGS LIKE "THAT ONE" AND "THAT WAY " , BUT HE STILL IS BEHIND
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282524_tn?1348492612
thanks for all of your input. and alot of you are right about being the third child, i never thought about that. thanks again.
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147172_tn?1226761778
I think the most important thing is to recognize whether your child understands what is being said to him and responds with actions or some words.  SOme kids talk later than others.  Once he gets started, I'm sure he won't shut up, LOL.  If you're really worried, have him evaluated but it doesn't seem abnormal to me based on my research and things I've heard from other parents.
  
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325405_tn?1262293778
If you are ever in doubt, go to the pediatrician.  If you live in the US, you can qualify for a 0 to 3 state program for therapies, even if it is just speech delay.  And even if you think your kid is really really bright, nothing to worry about, if therapy is free, take advantage of it!  Usually it is either free or a very small co-pay for therapies.  We are paying $6 per session and my daughter is getting better at speech every week through therapy.  They come to your house in many states, too.  So depending on what state you are in, you might have to go in to an office to have it done or have it at your house.  You can ask the pediatrician for information on early intervention services provided by the 0 to 3 state program.  Pediatricians generally assess that at the 24 month office visit and it takes about 6 weeks for therapy to get started once you get referred to the program.  Lots of paperwork, an initial questionarre thing to fill out to figure out who shoudl do the evaluation, the evaluation, a meeting to go over the evlauation and set up therapists, and then waiting for doctors to sign off on paperwork so therapy can start.   And you can stop the therapy program whenever you want, if you feel it isn't helping or your child no longer needs it.  They reasses the child every 3 months anyway, to see how they are doing.

WIth late talking, you really have to understand what is being said.  Some children, like my daughter, have receptive language delays.  Therapy can help that as well.  If you are concerned with things other than speech (no receptive language, bad eye contact, sensory issues, bad behaviors, not hitting milestones like walking or going up and down stairs at a proper age), you may consider going in early to the pediatrician's office to get a referral to the 0 to 3 program earlier than 24 months, but if it's just the speech, then I personally wouldn't worry so much about it until the 24 month checkup.  Totally take advantage of speech therapy, even if it is just because he is the third child.  Therapy might help him learn to talk for himself instead of having his siblings do it for him.  

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