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Beta Blockers for treatment
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Beta Blockers for treatment

My son was born with a Bi Cuspid Aorta, he is 10 now. He recently had an MRI done and it showed that his aortic dilation was 3.4 cm. The year before it was 2.9 cm. His cardiologist wants to put him on Beta blockers. What type of side effects if any are there? Is there anything else we could be doing to slow down the dilation?
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ive been on b.b propnolol and had no side effects, i had them for anxiety, they stop the heart from palpatating by blocking the beta receptors if i had a panic attack i wont get the palpatations, they block beta receptors. slow down the heart rate and reduce blood pressure, there are some bad side affects i'll be honest, and some minor, and some people have none at all, the doctor will prescribe these as trial to see if the dilation slows down as his bp will be lower, have a word with your doctor about this but he will not put him on anything hes unsure of, has he said what is causing the dilation?
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Hi hard1toobeat,
I am a mother of a 9 year old boy with a bicuspid aortic valve, aortic regurgitation and dilatation if his ascending aorta.  He was started on an ACE inhibitor last year for a short time to help decrease the afterload on his left ventricle and I do believe to help with his dilated aorta.

I belive that they want to start your son on this medication to help slow down some of his dilatation that is happening.  Here is some information on Beta Blockers and how they work.

Beta blockers, also known as beta-adrenergic blocking agents, are drugs that block norepinephrine and epinephrine (adrenaline) from binding to beta receptors on nerves. There are three types of beta receptors and they control several functions based on their location in the body.

Beta-1 (β1) receptors are located in the heart, eye, and kidneys;


beta (β2) receptors are found in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, liver, uterus, blood vessels, and skeletal muscle; and


beta (β3) receptors are located in fat cells.
Beta blockers primarily block β1 and β2 receptors. By blocking the effect of norepinephrine and epinephrine, beta blockers reduce heart rate; reduce blood pressure by dilating blood vessels; and may constrict air passages by stimulating the muscles that surround the air passages to contract.

You can also visit this website that you might find helpful.

http://www.medicinenet.com/beta_blockers/article.htm

I think they want to get your son to an adult age before they have to so any surgical repair or replacement. If they are an adult when they interviene it is more likely to last longer because he will be done growing.
Hope this helps.
Shel1234
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