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Neurocardiogenic syncope
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Neurocardiogenic syncope

Hi. After passing out at school, my son has just been diagnosed with Neurocardiogenic syncope/autonomic dysfunction. The cardiologist has reassured me that my son's heart is fine (an exam and two normal EKGs). The symptoms started with fatigue about a week ago, and he fainted shortly after departing from the bus at school last Friday. He continues to have pre-syncope spells every couple of hours or so, but it passes if he lies down or puts his head down. Does anyone here have a child that has this condition? It seemed to start out of nowhere, and seems so unusual for my child to feel fatigue and have the nausea, etc. He is a healthy (although a little on the small side), active 9 year old boy. I have been told by the cardiologist that the only thing to do is to try to control symptoms/prevent my son from actually fainting. We are pushing the fluids (gatorade) and increasing salt intake a little during meals. The cardiologist also said that this condition usually resolves itself in a matter or months to a year or so. He has opted not to try medicine unless my son actually faints again. I just hate to see my son not feeling so well. If anyone has any advice or input for me, it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

MM
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More than likely your son has this problem, however, he should have had a Tilt Table Test to really seal that diagnosis. Another thing is that he should eat plenty of protien as that is what helps to keep the body hydrated. Realistically, your son probably is just fine, so I wouldn't worry too much. Make sure he changes position slowly, especially when getting out of bed.
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Thanks for the advice. He likes Pediasure which has protein and vitamins, plus I'm giving him a flintstones vitamin each day. I'm not sure why they didnt give him the tilt test, but the cardiologist was very thorough about having my son and I explain exactly what he feels and what happens etc. and I'm sure he sees this alot. Thanks again.

MM
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Yes, it can happen to children. It's good that the PC explained this so well to you. Many are so busy, they just don't take the time. I wish you the best!
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Weird that I just found your post!! I am sitting in the hospital right now while my 8 year old daughter is hooked up to machines. She passed out this past Monday (white face, white lips, dilated pupils, completely unresponsive) and was sent home after an ER visit. She is back in the hospital tonight b/c she did the same thing today. We are trying to decide which route is the best for her to take. Can you believe that the doctors think she is passing out b/c of us fixing her hair?!?! What test did they do to diagnose your son, and if you don't mind me asking - does he have a heart murmur? My daughter does, but all her tests are coming back normal....I would really appreciate any advice you might have - I have been searching for hours for any post that might relate to our situation!! Thanks so much!!
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Tater, children don't pass out because mom is fixing their hair!!! Have you seen a pediatric cardiologist? If not, I suggest you do. Your daughter should probably have a 24-48 or 72 hour Holter test done. Check your family history for heart disease or sudden deaths at a young age. I am not saying your daughter has heart disease, understand that, but you want to make sure she doesn't and I wouldn't rely on the doctors who are saying she passed out because her hair was being done! A heart murmur may NOT be indicative of heart disease or condition; many choildren have heart murmurs known as Functional Murmurs and they usually are outgrown. Take her to a good pediatric cardiologist.
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Hi. My son had 3 EKGs done and all were normal. Of course your daughter didnt pass out because her hair is being done. What the doc who said that may have been saying is that while your daughter is sitting or standing very still (like when she is getting her hair done) her blood is pooling to her legs. Everyone's blood does this upon standing, sitting, etc. This is how the Cardiologist explained it to me....You brain and heart nerves work together to constrict your vessels to bring your blood pressure up, and bring your blood back to your head when you need it. In some children (and adults) this mechanism malfunctions, and the blood vessels dialate instead of constricting, and the heart slows down instead of speeding up like it should. Since blood doesnt get to your daughters head, she faints, then after lying down she is fine again. This is called Neurocardiogenic Syncope/Autonomic Dysfunction. Apparantly is onew of the main causes of fainting in children. If your daughter has had a normal EKG her heart is probably fine. This condition is benign, maning harmless just more of a pain in the butt to deal with. Other symptoms are fatigue, tiring easily (my son has this), headache and feeling nausea and pre-fainting symptoms. I was instructed to increase my son's salt intake, push fluids (Gatorade because it contains sodium) and have a snack in between meals. There are medications (Sudafed, etc) your daughter's doc may try since she has fainted twice. My son's doc opted to try to control symptoms without meds for now. Increasing fluid intake helps increase blood volume. Your daughter will need to learn how to recognize her pre fainting symptoms and sit with he head between knees, lie down, even crossing her legs and squeezing (like the pee pee dance :) will help bring her blood back to her head. The doc said that this condition usually resolves on its own but can take several months to a year or so. My son is taking gatorade and a snack to school. His school is working with us to avoid having him stand in lines, and allowing him to sit down if he feels woozy. Also, he has been instructed to stay out of P.E. for a few weeks. Basically, you should help your daughter learn to recognize when she should sit down etc. to help avoid fainting. I think Sudafed is the first drug my son doc said he would try if fainting occurs again. Ask yours. Again, I would recommend your daughter see Cardiologist for an exam and EKG and maybe a Tilt Test. Its probably not her heart....Yes my son does have a heart murmur, but is harmless. Hope your daughter feels better
MM
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