Pediatric Heart Expert Forum
Doctor ruling out ARVD? 16 yrs old
About This Forum:

Questions in this forum are answered by pediatric cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. This forum is for questions and support about pediatric heart problems, symptoms and topics such as heart murmurs, palpitations, fainting, chest pain, congenital heart defects (including management and intervention), fetal cardiology, adult congenital cardiology, arrhythmias and pre-participation athletic screening.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Doctor ruling out ARVD? 16 yrs old

I'm 16 and last week , I wore a holter monitor for 24 hours and was found to have frequent arrhythmias. He showed me on the ECG/paper where I had the arrhythmias and what I was was a few normal beats( normal sinus rhythm) and then I saw waves that lookes like repeated mountains or upside down W's but  rounded . By this description, was this V-tach? Echo was normal expect for mitral regurgitaion and stress test did not induce arrhythmia ( although I usually get arrhythmias during rest, not WHILE I'm running. ) I didn't tell the doctor that.
Also, while I was sleeping, my heart rate went down to 33. I am not athletic at all and may be considered a couch potato. I'm not overweight, though. I also have idiopathic hypertension.

The doctor now wants an MRI. His working diagnosis is arrhythmogenic w/ dysplasia. Is he referring to arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia? Does the Holter monitor/computer tell them WHERE the arrhythmias came from? For example, left or right ventricle? I mean, why would he want to rule out ARVD?
Tags: arvd
Related Discussions
773637_tn?1327450515
Dear Disneygurl,

I think that the doctor is indeed looking for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (probably was written arrhythmogenic RV dysplasia on the MRI request).  Without evaluating you and your studies, I cannot be sure why specifically ARVD/C would be his working diagnosis.  The ECG can have findings called episilon waves that are associated with this.  As well, if the early beats (I'm presuming premature ventricular contractions) were captured on the ECG, it can tell you from where they are arising.  However, the Holter monitor does not tell you from where the beats are coming; it only tells you if they are coming from multiple locations and how many there are.  Also, an echo can miss the RV findings of ARVD/C, which is why an MRI is helpful.

Of note, ARVD/C is very uncommon in the US, but is much more common in patients from the Veneto region of Italy.  
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
This Forum's Experts
773637_tn?1327450515
Jeffrey R Boris, M.D.Blank
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
773655_tn?1340656399
Marie M Gleason, M.D.Blank
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank