Pediatric Heart Expert Forum
PRBPM 11 year old
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PRBPM 11 year old

My girl has asthma allergies and eczema and has been using her fast acting albuterol every few hours for a few months. The pulmonologist tried a different course of action (Singular and Qvar) in addition to the rescue inhalers. This is not working and she has another appointment. However I am taking her to her ped in the am.

As a result of 11 years of stress I acquired a stethoscope and a oximeter. There was an occasssion where I should have called ambulance because of her blood ox. I use it to get a baseline, no to dx, I am not a doctor. I  just started using them as a baseline. Her asthma symptoms are getting worse.

The question is: If the PRBPM is fluctuating between 85 and 95 and earlier up to 105, while the oxygen is stable between 98-99 and both my oximeter rates (46 yo overweight female) are stable --- indicating it is probably not the meter ---- is this cause for ER treatment or can I calm down. Please help, I dont trust the doctors I have been seeing here in Orlando Florida. They are all over the place with her.

Thanks so MUCH!!
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The accuracy of the pulse oximeter is depending upon the accuracy of the pulse that it is picking up.   A heart rate between 85 and 95 bpm in an 11 year old having an asthma flare is not an elevated heart rate.  The mildly increased heart rate of 105 beats per minute is understandable if there is respiratory distress related to the asthma episode. Everyone's heart rate varies dependent upon the physiologic state.  Albuterol is well known to cause even more extreme temporary elevations in heart rate, but this is outweighed by the need to provide an open flow of air and oxygen to the body.
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