Pediatric Heart Expert Forum
Short, Sharp and Dizzy.
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Questions in this forum are answered by pediatric cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. This forum is for questions and support about pediatric heart problems, symptoms and topics such as heart murmurs, palpitations, fainting, chest pain, congenital heart defects (including management and intervention), fetal cardiology, adult congenital cardiology, arrhythmias and pre-participation athletic screening.

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Short, Sharp and Dizzy.

Hello,

I'm sorry for taking up a space that someone else could use but I really would like to know what to do about some pain I get. Just a bit of background information I was born with a large tumor on the base of my spine which was removed and I don't seem to be suffering from any reprocussions of that. However overall, I am almost always tired despite having a healthy sleep pattern although I find it very hard to get to sleep and then get up, I eat well and healthy foods too. I'm almost always cold and when i'm not I am really hot, its either one or the other if im honest.

I'm not the fittest of people but I do excercise, I sometimes go quite dizzy when I have been laying down for a few minutes or if I stand still for a prolonged period of time but the main problem I have is a short and sharp shooting pain that I get in the left side of my chest around where your heart is mean't to be. The pain can last from a few seconds to maybe 10 seconds and the intensity can be quite mellow to very nasty as well.

Once again, sorr for taking up some space someone else could of use and I thank anyone who replies with a helpful answer.
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773637_tn?1327450515
Dear Harry,

Without getting more history and evaluating you directly, it is difficult to say exactly what is going on.  However, what you have said, it is possible that you may have postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).  POTS is a dysautonomia, which is severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, the part of the nervous system that controls the automatic functions of the body.  It can be brought on after a viral infection (especially mononucleosis) or after surgery, or can be seen in people who have joint hypermobility syndrome (very flexible joints).  Symptoms can include severe fatigue, brief/sharp chest pain, extreme temperature intolerance, difficulty concentrating, dizziness and fainting, palpitations, and many other symptoms.

I recommend that you look at two websites for more information about this:  DINET (www.dinet.org) and DYNAKids (www.dynakids.org) and see if these descriptions appear to be consistent with what you are experiencing.  They also talk about simple, non-pharmacologic interventions that you can take.  I would also consider attempting to see a provider who is familiar with the diagnosis and management of POTS to see both if you do have POTS and if you can benefit from pharmacologic treatment.
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773637_tn?1327450515
Jeffrey R Boris, M.D.Blank
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
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