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What are the chances closure of VSD of 3.5 mm
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What are the chances closure of VSD of 3.5 mm

Hello Doctor,

I am vidya form India. My son is of 16 months old. During his birth he was diagnosied with a VSD of 4mm. Since his growth was normal (weight gain) and no other problems, our doctor asked to get it monitored every 6 months. Till 1 year there was no improvement. During last consulation, when he was 14 months, there is slight improvement. VSD size was 3.5mm.

Please let mek now, what are the chances of this VSD closure? How much time generally it may take? What if smaller sized VSD left unclosed? Is it harmful if it is left unclosed?

Waiting for your reply...

Best Regards
Vidya
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Dear Vidya,

A ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a hole in the wall between the two ventricles, the two pumping chambers of the heart.  It is one of the most common congenital cardiac defects that we see.  Based on the facts that your son is clinically doing well and that the defect measures 3.5 mm, I can say that the defect is small.  Therefore, it should not be causing him any significant problems.  The one thing I don’t know is where the defect is.  If it is a muscular defect, then it should cause no problems.  If it is a perimembranous defect, which is located beneath the aortic valve, it has the risk of deforming the aortic valve and causing it to prolapse and/or leak.

As far as the chance of defect closure, it depends if there is any tissue covering the defect.  Usually, these defects are covered by excess tissue from the tricuspid valve, the first valve on the right side of the heart.  If there is no excess tissue covering the defect, then the likelihood that it will spontaneously close is low.  If there is some tissue partially covering it, there is a somewhat better chance that, over time, it will close spontaneously.  However, if it is not otherwise causing problems, it can be left alone without significant risk of harm.
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