Pediatric Heart Expert Forum
pediatric ventricular hypertrophy
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pediatric ventricular hypertrophy

My son's pediatrician heard a slight heart murmur at his 2 year wellness check-up and suggested we see a cardiologist.  Two days later, he had an echocardiogram and an EKG done.  The echo came back normal, but the cardiologist noted on the EKG report 'possible left ventricular hypertrophy.'  Our pediatrician suggested we visit a pediatric cardiologist, but cannot get in with her until mid October (2 months away).  We were hoping this was not something that required immediate attention and are wondering what the risks and prognosis is of a child with this diagnosis.

Our son is not overweight, as most of what we researched suggested is the main cause in pediatric patients.  We have no idea how or why he has developed this.  Any help and/or advice is greatly appreciated.
Tags: LVH
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773637_tn?1327450515
Dear Shook,

Without evaluating your son, I cannot say what is causing this, or even if it's real.  This is why I am a strong proponent of not allowing primary care providers to order tests like echocardiograms.  They often refer patients to have their studies done at adult cardiology centers, who do not know how to best evaluate these patients.  A pediatric cardiologist can evaluate the patient and put any test results into appropriate context.  As well, their laboratory is more likely to be accredited as a pediatric echo lab.  

However, for the sake of discussion, let's say that your son actually does have left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).  If it is there, the potential reasons include some sort of obstruction to the left ventricle, such as aortic valve stenosis or coarctation of the aorta, or an intrinsic abnormality of the heart muscle, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or a metabolic abnormality.  If your son is clinically well, active, and is able to keep up with his peers without early fatiguing, passing out, turning blue, etc., and his heart rate, blood pressure, etc., are normal, he likely should be able to last till his appointment next month.
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Jeffrey R Boris, M.D.Blank
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
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