Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) Expert Forum
% of blockages and what they mean
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Questions in the Peripheral Arterial Disease forum are answered by Dr. Lee Kirksey, associate professor at The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Topics covered include abdominal aortic aneurysm , amputation, arteriovenous fistula, atherectomy, carotid artery surgery , cholesterol , claudication, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , endovascular aortic stent graft (EVAR), stent placement , stroke prevention, varicose veins , and venous insufficiency .

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% of blockages and what they mean

my dad is having to undergo heart bypass surgery in the next few months ..after anigiogram his % were 95,70 and 30 blocked
if he doesn't have this surgery what do these percentages actually mean for him.?
he doesn't want to know so wont ask.. but we want to know to try and understand how serious this is.
he took himself to a and e a month ago with mild chest pain and three weeks later we're told he needs bypass..it has just come as a a bit of a shock to us all
thanks for your time    jill
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Hello
Unfortunately your father sounds as if he has "symptomatic" coronary arter disease. That means that he has blockages in his artery which are preventing adequate oxygen from reaching his heart muscle. The symptom of chest pain is referred to as "angina". Fortunately, it sounds as if he did not have a "heart attack". A myocardial infarction or heart attack occurs when the oxygen supply is so inadequate, it causes the muscle to be injured. It is usually diagnosed by blood tests which show muscle injury.

Several treatments exist depending upon the severity of the blockages, the location, the condition and health of the patient. These include percutaneous angioplasty and stenting and coronary bypass. The decision is usually made after a discussion of medical provider and family following cardiac catheterization (angiogram)

Other disorders can mimic the chest pain of angina and some people advance to a heart attack without chest pain, arm pain or any typical symptoms.

Your father is fortunate to have this problem identified before he developed other problems. Good luck

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