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Blood clot during ER visit for spotting.
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Blood clot during ER visit for spotting.

Hello I am 7 weeks and 1 day pregnant and my Dr today told me I had a blood clot but didn't tell me where it was or what was causing it. On Saturday I went to the ER with some spotting and was told everything was normal and baby was measuring ok and there was a heartbeat.
How do I find out where my blood clot is and how it affects my baby? Thanks !
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The easiest way to find out is to ask your dr. He should've provided you with complete info regarding the issue but my guess is it may not be a big deal if he didn't go into too much detail. Glad to hear everything is going well with the baby. Take care. :)
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187316_tn?1386360282
Blood clots during pregnancy are called subchoronic hematoma's. I had one during pregnancy that cause me to bleed for almost 5 weeks non-stop but resolved itself before the 20th week. It shouldn't cause any problems with your baby at all since it is just bleeding behind the sac. Miscarriage from it is only reported in about 3% of all pregnancies.

AnnieBrooke over on the Maternal/Child Forum posted a REALLY good article about it yesterday so I'll copy and past for you.

This is an article from "Just Mommies."  There are many other good references on the web that you might want to check.

"SCH or Subchorionic Hematoma is a gathering of blood between the membranes of the placenta and the uterus. A more technical name is the chorion. Some doctors will also just refer to it as a blood clot.

"There is no known cause for an SCH but many researchers speculate that during egg implantation, the egg slightly separates or tears from the uterus causing a bleed. There is nothing a woman did or could have done to cause or prevent them. SCH occurs to pregnant women of all ages and races.

"Diagnosing an SCH is based on its symptoms and visualization via ultrasound scan. Many women visit the doctor or emergency department with the chief complaint of vaginal bleeding during early pregnancy. An ultrasound, either transvaginal or abdominal, would more than likely be carried out. During the ultrasound scan, the doctor or radiologist will locate the fetus and assess its current condition. ... After a visual of the blood clot is made, and it appears a woman is not having a miscarriage, the diagnosis of SCH is made.  Having a diagnosis of SCH instead of a miscarriage is probably a relief but having SCH comes with its own concerns.

"There is no formal treatment for this blood clot but each doctor is different. Some suggest that you can continue with your everyday activities while others may suggest taking it easy. Some physicians suggest refraining from sexual intercourse throughout pregnancy and bed rest. Surgery is not an option. Straining and heavy lifting should be avoided, as in a normal pregnancy.

"Some doctors prefer a ‘wait and see’ approach while others choose to use medications. Blood thinners [such as: aspirin, Lovenox (inj), Coumadin and Heparin (inj)] might be used in attempts to ‘bleed’ the clot out. Estrogen and progesterone therapy is also sometimes used to aid in the development of the pregnancy.

"The current statistics for pregnancy loss with an SCH is 1-3%. This low percentage is related to large clots. Most pregnancies progress with no further complications. Most clots resolve on their own by 20 weeks of pregnancy. The clot either bleeds itself out or the body absorbs it.

"Women with SCH are at greater risk for placental abruption or abruptio placenta. Placental abruption is when the placenta tears away from the uterus. This is an extreme pregnancy complication that requires immediate medical attention. If the placenta separates from the uterine wall, the health of the fetus is in danger.

"SCH is a risk early in pregnancy because the clot itself can cause a miscarriage. The clot can release completely from the uterus and cause the fetus and placenta to miscarry.

"Women with SCH may experience intermittent periods of vaginal bleeding throughout their pregnancy. This would more than likely be a result of the clot ‘bleeding out.’ Blood is an irritant to the uterus and cramping may be accompanied with the bleeding. While seeing blood while pregnant can be very scary, it is very common with SCH. Tampons and sexual intercourse is not generally recommended during bleeding/spotting periods.

"Allow yourself adequate rest and plenty of fluids. Dehydration can also cause the uterus to contract, irritating your baby and the clot.

"If you’ve been diagnosed with SCH, you’re not alone. Support groups have been popping up all over the internet in recent years. Women from all across the globe have been gathering through the worldwide web to share their experiences and offer hope to others going through the same thing."

© Rebecca Pillar 2007
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OMG thank you all soooo much this is such a relief to hear this information. The Dr said that either my body will absorb it or I will spot it out so that is good news. Again thank you ladies so much for all your help :)  
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187316_tn?1386360282
You're welcome! :)
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