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208686 tn?1293034103
C-sections tied to higher asthma risk for babies
LONDON - Babies born by Cesarean section are more likely to develop asthma than children delivered naturally, Swiss researchers said on Tuesday.

There has been conflicting evidence on the link between asthma and C-sections but the researchers said the number of children involved in their study and a long monitoring period strengthened their results.

The findings also underscore the potential risks of elective C-sections as more women in Western countries choose to avoid a natural birth, the researchers said in the medical journal, Thorax.

"The increased rate of Caesarean section is partly due to maternal demand without medical reason," Caroline Roduit of Kinderspital Zurich medical institution and colleagues wrote.

"In this situation the mother should be informed of the risk of asthma for her child, especially when the parents have a history of allergy or asthma."

Asthma, which affects more than 300 million people worldwide, is the most common pediatric chronic illness. Symptoms include wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and chest tightness.

Babies born by C-section are not exposed to their mother's bacteria when they pass through the birth canal -- something that helps prime the immune system and could explain the increased risk, the researchers said.

The Swiss findings are based on nearly 3,000 children whose respiratory health was monitored until age eight. By this time, about 12 percent, or 362 children, had been diagnosed with asthma for which a doctor had prescribed inhaled steroids.

About 9 percent of the children were born by C-section but these babies were nearly 80 percent more likely to develop asthma compared to those born vaginally, the researchers said.

The association was even stronger for the 9 percent of the children with two allergic parents who were already more predisposed to the respiratory condition, they wrote.

The findings follow a Norwegian study in July suggesting babies born by C-section have a moderately increased asthma risk. Other studies have found no link between C-sections and a child's long-term health, including asthma.

to read the article go to:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28005600/

Thought you all might like to know.
Patty
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480331 tn?1310407129
Great, another thing to worry about!   Just kidding!  Great info.
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384150 tn?1399908416
FYI
My Daughter has two parents who sufferd and suffer from Asthma, I had an asthma attack while 7 months pregnant.
She was an emergency  c- section and we have had a cat since before she was born.
She has no allergies and no sign of asthma at almost 4 years old.  She has had many head and chest colds during the winter and due to classmates, yet she never has breathing or lung issues.
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208686 tn?1293034103
Just found the information and thought I would pass it along. None of this is coming from me. Didn't want to worry anyone or make anyone mad, just thought you all would like to know. Sometimes we need all the information we can get to make certain choices. Also I think given emergency c-section over elective is where it makes the difference. I would definitely have an emergency c-section if it meant the best outcome for mom and/or baby.
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