Preventive Medicine Expert Forum
bad reaction to DTP vaccine
About This Forum:

Questions in this forum are being answered by medical professionals and experts. Topics covered are Primary Care Vaccinations, Infectious Disease Prevention, Cancer Screening, Cancer Prevention, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Heart Disease Prevention, Health Screening (includes non-cancer and non-cardiovascular diseases such as osteoporosis), Preventive Medicines, Healthy Living / Health and Wellness, Weight Loss, Healthy Eating, Pregnancy & Birth Control, Childhood Preventive Care, Tobacco & Alcohol Counseling, Primary Care.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

bad reaction to DTP vaccine

As a child my son had a bad reaction to the DTP vaccine - he passed out and woke up three hours later screaming shrilly and continued to scream for several hours.  We were advised not to let him have the DTP again.  The next time he got the DT vaccine instead and his arm turned bright red from shoulder to elbow.  The last vaccine he got was the Tetanus alone.  With that one he developed a hard, red, raised lump on his arm about the size of an orange.  That was when he was 15.  My question is, should he continue getting the Tetanus shot?  Is there a chance that his reaction to it will get worse over time?
Related Discussions
1351808_tn?1276904027
Thank you for your question. It is definitely an important concern. Here is a link to the vaccine information sheet from the CDC:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-td-tdap.pdf

Though your son's doctor would know best, I would characterize your son's reaction is significant enough to make the risks of vaccination not merit the harms. It is important to recognize that Tdap or DTP have three separate vaccines in them:

- Tetanus vaccination protects against a serious infection that can develop from nail punctures or cuts. Immunity lasts 10 years but your son can always get a booster dose in the event of a risky injury, when the benefits of vaccination are greater than in routine vaccination.
- Diphtheria is a rare disease in developed countries and even becoming rare in developing ones. With two doses of vaccines he has likely received sufficient immunity.
- Finally pertussis, which protects against whooping cough. This is the infection most likely to affect your son of the three in his lifetime but also the least life-threatening. Again this shifts the risks and benefits of vaccination.

Hope that helps,
Dr. Nundy
Blank
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank