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Pancreatitus
I just got out of the hospital with Pancreatitus.  This is about the 5th time in about the last 8 years I have had this.  I am 33 years old and about 30 lbs overweight.  Everytime this happens I am at my highest weight.  This time they ran ultrasounds and x-rays and found no gall stones.  They then ran a hidascan and my ejection rate was 16%.  They are wanting to take my gall bladder out and say that is probably my problem.  I just don't think it is.  I think the whole time it's been a weight problem and diabetes problem.  I am not diabetic, but I have been borderline for a few years now.  My triglycerides were 1600 when I went in to the doctor.  Do you think the gall bladder is the problem here?
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Treatment for patients who have pancreatitis due to high triglyceride levels includes weight loss, exercise, eating a low fat diet, controlling blood sugar, and avoiding alcohol and medications that can raise triglycerides (eg: thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers).

Studies have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the development of pancreatitis and that antioxidant supplementation may be of some benefit. Natural antioxidants include selenium, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E.

"Magnesium plays a pivotal role in the secretion and function of insulin; without it, diabetes mellitus is inevitable. Measurable magnesium deficiency is common in diabetes and in many of its complications, including heart disease, eye damage, high blood pressure, and obesity. When the treatment of diabetes includes magnesium, these problems are prevented or minimized." - Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, author of The Magnesium Miracle and Medical Director of the Nutritional Magnesium Association.
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