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Rabies from mice?
Hello,

I had something that was bizarre happen to me.  I have a boat that has to stay outside by the lake as per NY DEP regulations.  While i spent the day fishing and was all over that boat (only 12' long) and was in and out of all my fishing supplies.  I noticed at the end of the day that i had these baby mice all over the bottom of my boat.  I must of had a mice nest in my boat and the babies must have crawled out of the various benches.  My main concern is that i was exposed to rabies from possible contact with these baby mice that were all over the place.  When i got to land, i flipped the boat, and noticed the mothers tail come through the bench.  

This is just a weird situation, but i am concerned of possible contracting rabies from this situation with wild mice in my boat?

It has been four days since this has happened, and i notice the my hand and feet have had this weird numbness and tingling feeling?  Any help would be appreciated.

thank you

jon
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1386405 tn?1291591400
Here is a good website for you

http://pelotes.jea.com/rabies.htm

I also copied and pasted some of this info for you I hope that it helps you

How can you catch rabies? Rabies is usually transmitted through an animal bite. It is also possible to catch it if the animal’s saliva gets into a cut on your skin or in your eyes, nose, or mouth.

What animals can get rabies? All mammals, including people, can catch rabies. In Florida, there are four main animals that carry rabies: raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats.

What animals almost never have rabies? Rabbits, hamsters, squirrels, chipmunks, guinea pigs, gerbils, opossums, ,RATS AND MICE are hardly ever affected with rabies (Birds, fish, bugs, amphibians, & reptiles don’t get rabies either.) . You may still need a tetanus shot or other medical care if these animals bite you.

What are clues that an animal has rabies?

1) Rabid animals may stagger or stumble around, but not always. Other diseases or injuries can also cause this.

2) Rabid animals may become very mean and try to bite for no reason, OR they may be overly friendly.

3) Rabid animals may become hydrophobic (afraid of water), but NOT always. Sometimes they even swim and drink.
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Hi,
How are you? CDC recommends medical evaluation for any animal bite. ( http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/animals/index.html) Although rats and mice are not usually included, you may need a tetanus shot as well as direct examination especially if you have numbness and tingling feeling now. Take care and do keep us posted.
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hi,

I still have numbness and tingling in my hands, and legs.  Its weird that i get these symptoms this soon after it happens?  This happened on 9/23, you think i should go to the doctor and explain my situation to them?  I feel like they would think im crazy being worried about a mouse.

What can explain this numbness/tingling feeling?  Maybe lyme disease?  I'm 27 years old, slightly overweight (6'1", 200 pounds).  I am up to date with my tetanus, i got that shot two years ago.  

I didnt have a clean cut bite to my knowledge.  I am just concerned for being in such close proximity to these wild mice.  
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Hi,
Thanks for the update. Its good that you had your tetanus booster recently. Numbness and tingling are usually neurological symptoms and may be due to nerve compression or from neurological conditions. To ease any anxiety and worry , you can check with your attending physician. You can give the history and a neurological examination may also be indicated. Take care and best regards.
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