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Am I at a Higher Risk of a Collapsed Lung when Flying?
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Am I at a Higher Risk of a Collapsed Lung when Flying?

Am I at a Higher risk of a Collapsed Lung when Flying?
32 years ago I had a collapsed Lung at the age of 23. There was no sign of any Lung disease and no treatment given other than bedrest.  I did have a reocurrence a year or so later and again no treatment or evidence of any disease.  I have not had one since and have been well. I seem to remember at the Hospital they said that young tall males and middle age men are susseptible to the condition and advise me not to do any heavey work or fly for a while. What I would like to know is now that I am middle aged, am I at a very high risk of bringing on a collasped Lung if I fly on a Jet? I did ask my Doctor and he said yes I am at a higher risk but didnt say how much and failed to offer any further advice on the subject.  If there is a higher risk is there any test that can be done to determing the strenght of my Lungs?
Regards and many thanks,

Dreek.
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There is an increased incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in tall, thin individuals.  And, having had two pneumothoraces increases the likelihood of an individual having a 3rd or a 4th.  However, that increased possibility of recurrence would, almost certainly, be nullified by your having gone >30 years without a recurrence.

One's risk of a recurrent pneumothorax is not increased by flying at high altitude.  But, were a pneumothorax to occur while on a jet-liner, you might experience more respiratory distress than were you at sea level, but that too would not be a concern if you have healthy lungs.
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My husband has been told his lung has collapsed 2 cm a week ago.  He was not given any medication nor hospitalized and was told to go back to work as normal but avoid stressful activities that could pull something.  He feels much better and we are going to get it checked again this week.
He is a tall thin male, 29 years old.  We are heading to Italy for 2 weeks in a few days, the doctor has neither said to go or not to go but has almost just left it up to us.
Any suggestions? advice? statistics?
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