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Can you get thrush in your sinuses?
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Can you get thrush in your sinuses?

I'm recovering from a long bout of acute bronchitis, which required 3 courses of antibiotics and 2 courses of Prednisone to kick.  Last week I caught a cold that went immediately to a sinus infection, and at the same time developed a case of oral thrush.  Because the sinusitis discharge was so purulent (nonstop running yellow mucous, from only one side), after a few days my doctor started me on another course of Augmentin, and prescribed Nystatin for the oral thrush.  The discharge has lessened but the inflammation is still pretty intense (I'm using a nasal steroid spray as well).  Meanwhile, I continue to use Asmanex and Albuterol for my asthma.

My question is, could the sinusitis be caused by a yeast overgrowth in my sinuses?  It seems odd that I would get a bacterial infection 3 weeks after going off Levaquin.
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The answer is yes; the sinusitis could be caused by a yeast or fungal infection.  Or, possibly, the bronchitis, oral thrush and possibly even the sinusitis could be due to high dose inhaled steroids or an immunodeficiency state.  It has been shown that both asthma and inhaled steroids are independent risk factors for community acquired pneumonia/bronchitis.

Also, it is not so unusual that you might get a bacterial infection several weeks after completing the course of Levaquin.  This could be an opportunistic infection due to suppression of your normal bacterial flora by the antibiotic.

You should ask your doctor to consider sending a sample of the infected sinus material to the laboratory for bacterial and fungal, culture and microscopic examination, especially if the presumed sinus infection does not quickly show signs of responding to the Augmentin® (amoxicillin and clavulanate).  And, a CT scan of your sinuses to assess the need for mechanical aspiration of infected material, should the CT demonstrate an air fluid level in one or more sinuses.
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