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FEV1 and lung volume levels..
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FEV1 and lung volume levels..

Hello, I am a 55 yr. old female who was recently diagnosed with asthma and COPD at an asthma and allergy center. I smoked for many years but quit 6 years ago and never touched another one! I had increasing SOB when walking at a "normal" pace for very long, had difficulty getting over bouts of bronchitis, ect.  I am overweight and attributed most of the SOB to that.  When I finally got to the asthma center they quickly found out my lung volume was down to 48% and my FEV1 was 32.  They put me on oral steroids, Advair 500/50 , Spiriva and told to use the Proventil inhaler as needed. In about two months time the coughing has stopped, and I am doing much better generally.  I am off the oral steriods and dropped down to Advair 250. My lung volume is up to 63% and the FEV1 is now 41.  I still don't know what all this means..do I have moderate or severe COPD? They also did the blood test which was neg. for alfa 1...I have tried to research this on the internet but still am confused.  Thanks for being here for additional information...this forum was invaluable during my husbands surgery 3 years ago for an ascending aortic aneurysm surgery!  Thanks again...
OB
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Your forced vital capacity (FVC) and your forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) suggest that you have obstructive lung disease.  This is most commonly due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma or a combination of both.  Your values suggest moderately severe disease.  Further testing would be helpful to know how much of this is COPD/emphysema.  The testing could include more complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and/or CT scanning of the lungs.

The response of your lungs to the medicines is most encouraging.  Given more time, your lung function may continue to improve.  For guidance with ongoing treatment and for an estimate of your prognosis, you should talk with a pulmonologist about the available test results and your response to the medicines.
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