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GERD/Asthma Connection?
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GERD/Asthma Connection?

I'm a 63 year old male who was siagnosed with Whopping Cough in the Summer of 2006.  The syptoms (symptoms) died down after about 4 months.  The trouble is I have experienced symtoms (symptoms) of asthma and cronic (chronic) cough ever since. I never had a problem with allergies or asthma prior to the whooping cough.  My coughing seems to be a big part of the problem. Not only do I suffer from thick flem (phlegm), but I cough up somewhat darker matter mixed in.  I'm sure it is this darker matter that causes me to coupgh, since I get relief once I cough it up, although it is very hard to accomplish and causes quite a strain to cough it up.  All this has lead to periods of shortness of breath and asthma like symptoms.  I suspect it might be a problem with GERD causing the asthma.  I don't suffer heartburn so I also supect Laryngoppharyngeal reflux.  I think the dark matter could be digested food but it's hard to tell.Are there any studies out about whooping cough causing these kind of symptoms in older adults and possible succesful treatments?  Is a lung speciaalist or ear, nose and throat doctor the best to conduct esophgeal testing?  Any other suggestions or direction where to go from here?
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Persistence of cough for months or longer, following acute whooping cough also called pertussis, is not rare.  It may occur with or without asthma.  In addition asthma or what is called bronchial hyperreactivity may also occur after a great variety of viral or bacterial infections, including after pertussis.  In this instance, inhalant drugs used to treat asthma may be helpful.

Yes, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) could be causing both cough and asthma symptoms.  Initial testing for GERD, a condition that can occur without heartburn, is best done with what is called a pH probe, which measures the acid in the esophagus to see if digestive juices are coming up from the stomach.  If this is equivocal, direct examination of the esophagus may be necessary.

Finally, one should consider the possibility that neither of the above is the cause and there is a third, undiagnosed, cause.  You should have a chest x-ray and the right specialist to see is a lung specialist.  S/he can evaluate both your lungs and your esophagus.
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rhult,

Did you have any symptoms of asthma/GERD prior to the onset of whooping cough?

A co-worker and I both had an awful upper respiratory infection this winter that -- at least for me -- lasted several weeks.  I had no issues with acid reflux prior to the onset of the infection except for the occasional pizza eaten too late at night.  Since the infection, I've been on proton pump inhibitors for acid reflux.

I didn't see a doctor at the time, but my doctor suspects that it may have been whooping cough.

I am wondering if there is a connection between a strain of whooping cough and acid reflux.  For me, heartburn began just as the infection seemed to be winding down.

arboricola
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Avatar_n_tn
No symptoms of either asthma or GERD prior to my diagnosed bout with Whooping Cough.  It just seems too much of a coincidence to think that all my problems aren't directly related to the Whooping Cough, but who knows for sure.  It would be interesting to hear from others who have experienced the same thing to see if there is a pattern and if the 3 or 4 months of violent coughing in an adult is what does it.  Perhaps, young children's bodys are better able to stand up to Whooping Cough without suffering GERD/Asthma complications afterwards.
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By complete coincidence, I am suffering in a very similar way to you; that's GERD symtoms (symptoms) after a bad case of Whooping Cough which has lasted for around the last three months. My guess is that the severe cough  - which had me passing out and falling over on a few occasions - may have caused a Hiatus Hernia which I understand plays a part in acid reflux and GERD. I too have not experienced any heartburn or indegestion problems before the initial Whooping Cough, but I have to say that I have unexplained pains in the left part of my chest now. I am also coughing up fair amounts of phlegm, but no 'darker matter'. I am a 44 year old male and otherwise very healthy.
I am in the process of getting checked out re this, but in the meantime if anyone can offer advice I would be most appreciative.      
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