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Just a mess.
In 2005 I had a very rare abscess in my thoat. I was told by many doctors that they learn about this in med school but were told to forget about it because they wont ever need it. Ever since then I have always felt like I have had trouble breathing.  Suddenly I feel short of breath.  A year later my husband and I decided to have a baby. It was a very bad pregnancy because of my hormone levels being really off I was told at any point in a time I could miscarry and then later in the pregnancy I ended up with preeclampsia. I had to have a c-section so I ended up with a spinal epadural. 2 months later I had to have my gall bladder out.  Now since having my gall bladder out I have had shooting pain up my spine, my chest will feel very tight and I feel as if I cant breath.  All of the sudden I dont know if I am having really bad panic attacks or if I am actually having a hard time breathing.  I went to the doctor about my chest feeling as if it was closing in on me and he tested me for sleep apnea.  The test came back that my O2 levels droped as low as 85% during the night.  I was informed that after having my gall bladder out my O2 levels were about 78% while being awake. I am 22 years old and I feel like I should be about 80.  All these problems and no idea whats going on.  Has anyone ever had any of these problems?  Or anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks
Amanda
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Well have you seen a pulmonologist?  Have you had an echo of your heart or pulmonary function tests?  Are you on oxygen at night or CPAP if you have sleep apnea?  Do you have a cough?  Is the shortness of breath now and then or always with exertion?  Ask your physician about vocal cord dysfunction.  Are you on any meds or have any other medical problems?
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